FOSS Force News Wire http://fossforce.com <![CDATA[Linux 4.18 arrives fashionably late while Zorin OS shines up its Windows]]> http://go.theregister.com/feed/www.theregister.co.uk/2018/08/14/zorin_and_linux/ http://go.theregister.com/feed/www.theregister.co.uk/2018/08/14/zorin_and_linux/ Wed, 15 Aug 2018 16:50:25 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[Prisons Switch Device Providers; Render $11.3 Million Of Inmate-Purchased Music Worthless]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/techdirt/feed/~3/cuy4eLVfEiM/prisons-switch-device-providers-render-113-million-inmate-purchased-music-worthless.shtml http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/techdirt/feed/~3/cuy4eLVfEiM/prisons-switch-device-providers-render-113-million-inmate-purchased-music-worthless.shtml Wed, 15 Aug 2018 16:31:55 +0000 Yet again, when it comes to digital goods, you don't own what you buy. Inmates in Florida's prison system are learning this fact of life, thanks to a change in jail "entertainment" providers.

In April last year, the Florida Department of Corrections struck a deal with JPay. The private company, spearheading a push to sell profit-driven multimedia tablets to incarcerated people across the country, would be allowed to bring the technology to every facility in the nation’s third-largest prison system.

But there was a catch.

Inmates had already been purchasing electronic entertainment for the last seven years — an MP3 player program run by a different company: Access Corrections. For around $100, Access sold various models of MP3 players that inmates could then use to download songs for $1.70 each. Inmates could keep them in their dorms.

The demand was clear. More than 30,299 players were sold, and 6.7 million songs were downloaded over the life of the Access contract, according to the Department of Corrections. That’s about $11.3 million worth of music.

Because of the tablets, inmates will have to return the players, and they can't transfer the music they already purchased onto their new devices.

The corrections system is switching to JPay. Unfortunately, nothing else is switching. Money isn't easy to obtain in prison, meaning most of this suddenly useless music was purchased with funds from friends and family at inflated prices. The prison system comes out of it OK. It has collected $11.3 million on the sale of worthless infinite goods to a literally captive audience.

Now, with a lucrative JPay contract in effect, inmates are out millions of dollars in digital goods. The only options to keep what they purchased means shelling out more cash for the opportunity to put their purchased music completely out of reach.

The Department of Corrections negotiated an extension with Access Corrections to allow inmates to keep their MP3 players until January 23, 2019 if they choose not to participate in the tablet program.

Manderfield, the department spokesman, said that a department code prohibits inmates from owning more than one MP3 player at a time, but even without that, inmates would be able to keep the players because the contract is ending and there would be no way to service them.

Once returned, the inmates can pay a $25 fee to have their device unlocked or their music downloaded onto a CD before being shipped out to a non-prison address.

All of this stupidity is made possible by greed, greed, and more greed. First, the move to JPay gives Florida prisons even more money: $2.75 every time someone adds money to a JPay account, as well as a cut of any new content sold to inmates for the new devices. This has already resulted in $3.9 million in commissions over a twelve-month period covering April 2017 to March 2018.

The music end involves greed as well. Licensing is a nightmare, thanks to the endless meddling of music labels and performance rights organizations. An MP3 should be able to travel to any other device that supports that format, but it never does (especially not if the devices are controlled by an outside contractor). Licensing fees paid by Access Corrections apparently don't cover transfers of infinite goods to devices produced and sold by someone else. JPay handles its own licensing and even if it covers much of the purchased music, that's just not acceptable to everyone up the line waiting with their hands out.

People who don't have much money or any way to earn much of it are out $11.3 million. The prison gets paid. The service contractors get paid. The labels and PROs get paid. Everyone comes out of this fine except for the people who paid for the goods. If they want to "own" more music, they'll be paying everyone else twice for something they bought.



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Yet again, when it comes to digital goods, you don't own what you buy. Inmates in Florida's prison system are learning this fact of life, thanks to a change in jail "entertainment" providers.

In April last year, the Florida Department of Corrections struck a deal with JPay. The private company, spearheading a push to sell profit-driven multimedia tablets to incarcerated people across the country, would be allowed to bring the technology to every facility in the nation’s third-largest prison system.

But there was a catch.

Inmates had already been purchasing electronic entertainment for the last seven years — an MP3 player program run by a different company: Access Corrections. For around $100, Access sold various models of MP3 players that inmates could then use to download songs for $1.70 each. Inmates could keep them in their dorms.

The demand was clear. More than 30,299 players were sold, and 6.7 million songs were downloaded over the life of the Access contract, according to the Department of Corrections. That’s about $11.3 million worth of music.

Because of the tablets, inmates will have to return the players, and they can't transfer the music they already purchased onto their new devices.

The corrections system is switching to JPay. Unfortunately, nothing else is switching. Money isn't easy to obtain in prison, meaning most of this suddenly useless music was purchased with funds from friends and family at inflated prices. The prison system comes out of it OK. It has collected $11.3 million on the sale of worthless infinite goods to a literally captive audience.

Now, with a lucrative JPay contract in effect, inmates are out millions of dollars in digital goods. The only options to keep what they purchased means shelling out more cash for the opportunity to put their purchased music completely out of reach.

The Department of Corrections negotiated an extension with Access Corrections to allow inmates to keep their MP3 players until January 23, 2019 if they choose not to participate in the tablet program.

Manderfield, the department spokesman, said that a department code prohibits inmates from owning more than one MP3 player at a time, but even without that, inmates would be able to keep the players because the contract is ending and there would be no way to service them.

Once returned, the inmates can pay a $25 fee to have their device unlocked or their music downloaded onto a CD before being shipped out to a non-prison address.

All of this stupidity is made possible by greed, greed, and more greed. First, the move to JPay gives Florida prisons even more money: $2.75 every time someone adds money to a JPay account, as well as a cut of any new content sold to inmates for the new devices. This has already resulted in $3.9 million in commissions over a twelve-month period covering April 2017 to March 2018.

The music end involves greed as well. Licensing is a nightmare, thanks to the endless meddling of music labels and performance rights organizations. An MP3 should be able to travel to any other device that supports that format, but it never does (especially not if the devices are controlled by an outside contractor). Licensing fees paid by Access Corrections apparently don't cover transfers of infinite goods to devices produced and sold by someone else. JPay handles its own licensing and even if it covers much of the purchased music, that's just not acceptable to everyone up the line waiting with their hands out.

People who don't have much money or any way to earn much of it are out $11.3 million. The prison gets paid. The service contractors get paid. The labels and PROs get paid. Everyone comes out of this fine except for the people who paid for the goods. If they want to "own" more music, they'll be paying everyone else twice for something they bought.



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Techdirt
<![CDATA[Links 15/8/2018: Akademy 2018 Wrapups and More Intel Defects]]> http://techrights.org/2018/08/15/more-intel-defects/ http://techrights.org/2018/08/15/more-intel-defects/ Wed, 15 Aug 2018 16:23:27 +0000

GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • Former OSS Executive Eren Niazi Named Open Source Evolution CTO

    Open Source Evolution, visionaries and creators of enterprise custom software, announced today that former OSS founder, Eren Niazi has been named CTO. A 20-year technology veteran, Niazi has been focused on developing custom enterprise open source software for corporate transformations to open source.

    Eren is the original visionary/creator who pioneered the OSS movement and envisioned a world where the enterprises used open source software for large scale data center deployments. Consequently, the OSS technologies Niazi developed have become the model for global industry storage solutions.

  • How To Get An Open Source Developer Job In 2018
  • Tesla to make driverless software open source

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk has told a hacker conference in Las Vegas that he plans to “open source” the software his company uses to secure autonomous-driving features from hacks or takeovers, eventually allowing other carmakers to use it.

    Musk tweeted, “Great Q&A @defcon last night. Thanks for helping make Tesla & SpaceX more secure! Planning to open-source Tesla vehicle security software for free use by other car makers. Extremely important to a safe self-driving future for all.”

  • DarkHydrus Relies on Open-Source Tools for Phishing Attacks [Ed: If there was reliance on something proprietary, the headline would not even mention it; that's because its sole goal is to demonise Open Source, associating it with criminal activity. This actually impacts proprietary software from Microsoft, complete with NSA back doors.]
  • Progress Open Sources ABL Code with Release of Spark Toolkit

    Previously only available from Progress Services, the Spark Toolkit was created in collaboration with the Progress Common Component Specification (CCS) project, a group of Progress® OpenEdge® customers and partners defining a standard set of specifications for the common components for building modern business applications. By engaging the community, Progress has leveraged best practices in the development of these standards-based components and tools to enable new levels of interoperability, flexibility, efficiencies and effectiveness.

    [...]

    It is compatible with the latest version of OpenEdge, 11.7, and is available under Apache License 2.0. More components are expected to be added in the future.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Rustfmt 1.0 release candidate

        The current version of Rustfmt, 0.99.2, is the first 1.0 release candidate. It is available on nightly and beta (technically 0.99.1 there) channels, and from the 13th September will be available with stable Rust.

        1.0 will be a huge milestone for Rustfmt. As part of it’s stability guarantees, it’s formatting will be frozen (at least until 2.0). That means any sub-optimal formatting still around will be around for a while. So please help test Rustfmt and report any bugs or sub-optimal formatting.

      • Welcome Amy Keating, our incoming General Counsel

        Amy joins Mozilla from Twitter, Inc. where she has been Vice President, Legal and Deputy General Counsel. When she joined Twitter in 2012, she was the first lawyer focused on litigation, building out the functions and supporting the company as both the platform and the employee base grew in the U.S. and internationally. Her role expanded over time to include oversight of Twitter’s product counseling, regulatory, privacy, employment legal, global litigation, and law enforcement legal response functions. Prior to Twitter, Amy was part of Google, Inc.’s legal team and began her legal career as an associate at Bingham McCutchen LLP.

      • Building Extension APIs with Friend of Add-ons Oriol Brufau

        Please meet Oriol Brufau, our newest Friend of Add-ons! Oriol is one of 23 volunteer community members who have landed code for the WebExtensions API in Firefox since the technology was first introduced in 2015. You may be familiar with his numerous contributions if you have set a specific badge text color for your browserAction, highlighted multiple tabs with the tabs.query API, or have seen your extension’s icon display correctly in about:addons.

        While our small engineering team doesn’t always have the resources to implement every approved request for new or enhanced WebExtensions APIs, the involvement of community members like Oriol adds considerable depth and breadth to technology that affects millions of users. However, the Firefox code base is large, complex, and full of dependencies. Contributing code to the browser can be difficult even for experienced developers.

        As part of celebrating Oriol’s achievements, we asked him to share his experience contributing to the WebExtensions API with the hope that it will be helpful for other developers interested in landing more APIs in Firefox.

      • L10N Report: August Edition

        After a quick pause in July, your primary source of localization information at Mozilla is back!

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • This powerful free office program can replace Microsoft Office

      Even better, as we said, LibreOffice can open and edit the documents you made in Office and can save new files in Office formats. LibreOffice is also compatible with the most popular document formats, not just Office documents. It’s also compatible with OpenDocument Format (ODF) and you can even sign PDF documents without having to involve your printer!

  • Pseudo-Open Source (Openwashing)

  • Openness/Sharing/Collaboration

    • Musical Space: Open Source Music

      The term “open source” was coined 20 years ago this month by some software engineers who had the radical idea of allowing their code to be freely shared, copied and modified by anyone else. They realized they could make more money by giving away their product instead of selling it, and selling the support services instead. The open source model is a growing part of the arts, and nowhere more than in music. Recordings make so little money that creators now offer them for free and make their money from live shows instead.

    • Open Hardware/Modding

      • Hobbyist 3D prints open source CNC machine for under $200

        Hobbyist and Reddit 3D printing community contributor Marioarm has built an “almost fully” 3D printed CNC machine for milling electronic chipboards.

        Marioarm built the Cyclone PCB CNC machine with 3D printed parts downloaded from file sharing sites such as Thingiverse and the GitHub repository Cyclone PCB Factory. With minimal, prefabricated parts, the project in total cost Marioarm under $200 to build.

  • Programming/Development

    • [Older] Julia 1.0 release Opens the Doors for a Connected World

      Today Julia Computing announced the Julia 1.0 programming language release, “the most important Julia milestone since Julia was introduced in February 2012.” As the first complete, reliable, stable and forward-compatible Julia release, version 1.0 is the fastest, simplest and most productive open-source programming language for scientific, numeric and mathematical computing.

    • This Week in Rust 247
    • BARR-C Aims to Make Us Better Programmers

      Look up “panacea” and you’ll find a bunch of C programming tools. Everyone and his dog has ideas about how to create better, more reliable C code. Use an ISO-certified compiler. Follow MISRA C guidelines. Write the comments first. Agile Programming. Energy crystals. The late-night remedies never end.

      Or, you could learn from the master. Michael Barr does embedded programming. He’s got a Masters in electrical engineering; was an adjunct professor of EE/CS; was Editor-in-Chief of Embedded Systems Programming magazine; founded consulting company Netrino to teach people how to write better code; then founded Barr Group to do it again. The man knows a few things about writing embedded software, mostly by watching his clients and students doing it badly. There’s no substitute for experience, and this guy has collected decades worth of it.

      So it’s no surprise that he’s come up with his own little black book of programming pointers. These are the rules, guidelines, and suggestions gleaned from years of reviewing other peoples’ bad code and then fixing it. Best of all, a PDF download of the book is free. If you’re a traditionalist, you can buy the paperback version from Amazon.

Leftovers

  • In Defense Of Slow News

    Many years back, I remember seeing Michael Arrington, the founder of TechCrunch, being interviewed about that site (which at the time was on its way to becoming the first “mainstream” tech news blog). I’m paraphrasing, and possibly misremembering, but what stuck with me was that he suggested that, as a blog, you basically had to focus on one of three things to succeed: being first, being funny, or being insightful. And he had chosen “being first” as the strategy for TechCrunch — trying to break news as quickly as possible. And while that makes sense as a business strategy if you can do it, it had absolutely no appeal to me for how we ran Techdirt. We always hoped to focus on adding more insight into various issues, than breaking news. That’s not to say we don’t break news every so often, but it’s certainly not the focus.

  • Health/Nutrition

    • Flint, Michigan Still Has Polluted Water: Here’s How To Help

      Perhaps the biggest lesson to take away from Flint’s water crisis is this: Don’t for a second think this couldn’t have been your town. This didn’t happen on some faraway island or in a Third World country, but right in America’s own backyard. “From every objective measure that is out there, Flint’s water is like any other US city with old lead pipes,” adds Virginia Tech’s Siddhartha Roy, one of the researchers who brought the scandal to light. So take note and stay in the fight, because if you don’t and your elected officials one day decide that your water looking and smelling like orc blood isn’t their problem, you’ll spend a really long time picking chunks out of your teeth after every brushing. And if that sentence isn’t enough for you to take an interest in local politics, we don’t know what will.

    • Illinois Lawmakers Search for Solutions for Children Stuck in Psychiatric Hospitals

      Illinois lawmakers Tuesday heard testimony from nearly a dozen doctors and child welfare advocates describing circumstances facing children who languish in psychiatric hospitals even after they had been cleared for discharge — circumstances so harrowing that some children chose jail over another night at a psychiatric facility.

      State Sen. Julie Morrison, a Democrat from Deerfield, called for the Senate Human Services Committee hearing following a ProPublica Illinois investigation that revealed that hundreds of children in care of the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services spent weeks or months at a time locked in psychiatric hospitals after doctors had cleared them for release.

      The investigation, published in June, found that children in DCFS care were trapped inside psychiatric hospitals between 2015 and 2017 for a total of more than 27,000 days beyond what was medically necessary. During that time, the state spent nearly $7 million on unnecessary psychiatric care for children as young as 4.

      And the problem, ProPublica Illinois found, has only been getting worse. In 2014, only 88 psychiatric admissions were not medically needed compared with 301 last year.

  • Security

  • Defence/Aggression

    • How Militaries Should Plan for AI

      Today we are publishing a new EFF white paper, The Cautious Path to Strategic Advantage: How Militaries Should Plan for AI. This paper analyzes the risks and implications of military AI projects in the wake of Google’s decision to discontinue AI assistance to the US military’s drone program and adopt AI ethics principles that preclude many forms of military work.

      The key audiences for this paper are military planners and defense contractors, who may find the objections to military uses of AI from Google’s employees and others in Silicon Valley hard to understand. Hoping to bridge the gap, we urge our key audiences to consider several guiding questions. What are the major technical and strategic risks of applying current machine learning methods in weapons systems or military command and control? What are the appropriate responses that states and militaries can adopt in response? What kinds of AI are safe for military use, and what kinds aren’t?

      Militaries must make sure they don’t buy into the machine learning hype while missing the warning label.

      We are at a critical juncture. Machine learning technologies have received incredible hype, and indeed they have made exciting progress on some fronts, but they remain brittle, subject to novel failure modes, and vulnerable to diverse forms of adversarial attack and manipulation. They also lack the basic forms of common sense and judgment on which humans usually rely.

    • ‘Do We Deserve to Kill?’ The Answer Is ‘No’ After Nebraska’s Latest Execution

      Nebraska’s fentanyl execution was only possible because the state delayed Moore’s execution for nearly four decades — depleting his will to fight.

      “The death penalty is not about whether people deserve to die for the crimes they commit,” as Bryan Stevenson, executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, frequently explains. “The real question of capital punishment in this country is, ‘Do we deserve to kill?’” For those of us who are most familiar with the legal deficiencies and human cruelties of capital punishment, the answer is a resounding no.

      Nebraska’s execution of Carey Dean Moore this morning proves the point.

      As a society, we have determined that a death sentence requires that our process for determining who is guilty, for determining whom should be executed, and for executing humanely are transparent and above reproach. By any standard, Nebraska should not have had the authority to kill Moore today with an experimental fentanyl drug protocol.

      Moore’s case is remarkable for several reasons. First, he has spent 38 years on death row, the longest known period between death sentence and execution in American history. Second, six years ago, he gave up all appeals and refused to fight for his life.

      On the surface, it may appear that Nebraska could execute Mr. Moore without judicial oversight or safeguards because Moore agreed to be executed. But looking more deeply, we know Moore’s decision to stop fighting for his life is the result of Nebraska holding him for decades on death row without executing him.

    • Defense Inspector General to Investigate Military’s Toxic Open Burning

      The Department of Defense’s internal watchdog is launching an investigation into the military’s heavily polluting practice of open burning and detonating hazardous explosive materials on its properties, as well as its frequent reliance on federal contractors to carry out that work.

      The inquiry, announced Aug. 10 on the website of the department’s Office of Inspector General, will examine whether the department’s practices are legal, and whether the contractors charged with handling dangerous materials — often close to the public — have proper oversight.

      “Robust oversight of these contractors is essential for protecting the health and well-being of all who work and live near these installations,” Democratic Rep. Carol Shea-Porter of New Hampshire wrote to ProPublica in an email. “But it is clear that this oversight did not take place.”

    • 10 Questions on Secret Israeli Report Over 2014 Killing of Four Children on Gaza Beach

      Findings raise questions about decision-making process that led to shooting at children when they didn’t pose a threat. This requires clarification on use of drones, IDF’s open-fire policy and responsibility of those involved

    • Police take former MEIO director- general’s statement over CIA letter

      Police have taken the statement of the former Malaysian External Intelligence Organisation (MEIO) director-general Datuk Hasanah Abdul Hamid on a letter she wrote to the United States’ Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

      Without revealing when Hasanah’s statement was taken, the Inspector-General of Police (IGP) Tan Sri Mohamad Fuzi Harun said police had also called several other MEIO officers to assist investigations.

      He said police would also be taking the statements of several MEIO officers in Washington.

      “We will later send the investigation papers to the deputy public prosecutor for further action,” he told reporters after Bukit Aman Monthly Assembly here yesterday.

  • Transparency/Investigative Reporting

    • DNC lawsuit against WikiLeaks served via Twitter

      The Democratic National Committee has used Twitter to serve a lawsuit against WikiLeaks that accuses the website of participating in a conspiracy to hack into DNC emails and denigrate Hillary Clinton.

      U.S. District Judge John Koeltl of Manhattan granted the motion to serve via Twitter and mail on Aug. 6. The DNC’s law firm, Cohen Milstein, served the suit on Aug. 10 through a Twitter account that was apparently created for that purpose, report CBS News, Gizmodo and TechCrunch.

      The DNC had told the court in a July 20 motion to allow the alternate service that WikiLeaks “has more of a virtual than a physical presence.” The motion cited a California case in which a federal court allowed service via Twitter of a suit against a Kuwaiti national accused of financing ISIS activities.

      The DNC had not been able to serve the lawsuit by other methods, the motion said. DNC lawyers tried sending emails to an address provided on the WikiLeaks website and contacting lawyers who had represented WikiLeaks in other matters. The emails were returned as undeliverable, and the lawyers who responded said they no longer represented WikiLeaks and were not authorized to accept service.

    • Mueller investigation seeks to implicate WikiLeaks and Julian Assange in “Russian interference”

      The investigation headed by Special Counsel and former FBI director Robert Mueller into alleged “collusion” between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential election has entered a new stage.

      Mueller is seeking to substantiate the case he advanced last month—as part of the indictment of 12 Russian intelligence officers—that Trump campaign insider Roger Stone and WikiLeaks editor Julian Assange were part of a conspiracy to hack and publish emails sent by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairperson John Podesta (see: “In run-up to Trump-Putin summit, Mueller charges 12 Russian officers with DNC email hack”).

  • Finance

    • ‘There is a Strong Reason for All Americans to Feel more Economically Insecure than they Did Before the Great Recession’

      Last September, elite media were heralding numbers suggesting that incomes were up among middle class Americans, but tiptoeing around the fact that the rising tide was not lifting all boats. Dedrick Asante-Muhammad is Senior Fellow, Racial Wealth Divide, at the group Prosperity Now. He told CounterSpin about a report he co-authored, called The Road to Zero Wealth: How the Racial Wealth Divide Is Hollowing Out America’s Middle Class, from Prosperity Now and the Institute for Policy Studies. I asked why they chose to focus on racial disparities in wealth.

    • Why Isn’t Blockchain Technology Adoption Soaring?
    • Almost 80% of US workers live from paycheck to paycheck. Here’s why

      But the official rate hides more troubling realities: legions of college grads overqualified for their jobs, a growing number of contract workers with no job security, and an army of part-time workers desperate for full-time jobs. Almost 80% of Americans say they live from paycheck to paycheck, many not knowing how big their next one will be.

      Blanketing all of this are stagnant wages and vanishing job benefits. The typical American worker now earns around $44,500 a year, not much more than what the typical worker earned in 40 years ago, adjusted for inflation. Although the US economy continues to grow, most of the gains have been going to a relatively few top executives of large companies, financiers, and inventors and owners of digital devices.

  • AstroTurf/Lobbying/Politics

    • If Collusion Is in the Eye of the Beholder…

      …then the person observing gets to decide what collusion is, right?

    • ‘People are terrified’: Trump staffers live in fear of Omarosa’s next tape

      A daily trickle of revealing internal conversations between staffers. Growing anxiety about what one might have once said. No sense of how long it will go on.

      Omarosa Manigault Newman’s slow release of secretly taped conversations from inside the Trump campaign and White House is having the same effect on staffers as the daily dumps from WikiLeaks had on Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign, when chairman John Podesta’s emails were trickled out during the final stretch of the race.

    • Trump-Omarosa feud rooted in her allegations of racism
    • The Latest: Omarosa tells AP: ‘I will not be silenced’

      Omarosa Manigault Newman declared “I will not be silenced” by the Trump campaign.

      Manigault Newman spoke to The Associated Press hours after the president’s campaign announced it was filing an arbitration action against the former aide alleging she broke a secrecy agreement.

      In an interview with AP, Manigault Newman said she believes the action was intended to keep her from telling her story. She says she “will not be intimidated.”

  • Censorship/Free Speech

  • Privacy/Surveillance

    • What You Should Know Before Buying a Wired Security Camera System

      One huge benefit of having a wired security camera system is that you don’t need to connect it to the internet to use it—unlike most Wi-Fi cams, which require an internet connection to do anything.

      The downside to an off-the-grid camera system, however, is that you won’t be able to access it remotely from your phone if you’re away from home. Instead, you can only view and manage your camera system from the DVR box and the connected monitor and peripherals.

    • Australian Gov’t Floats New Batch Of Compelled Access Legislation With An Eye On Encryption

      The Australian government is looking to revamp its compelled access laws to fight encryption and other assorted technological advances apparently only capable of being used for evil. It’s getting pretty damn dark Down Under, according to the Department of Home Affairs’ announcement of the pending legislation.

      [...]

      There’s the limitation of lawmaking. Lawbreakers break laws and they’re not going to stop just because you’ve told them not to with a government mandate. Legislation [PDF] like this does little more than make life more difficult for service providers and device makers while undermining the privacy and security of millions of law-abiding citizens.

      The explanation sheet [PDF] notes the government is not seeking to mandate encryption backdoors. That being said, it would like providers of encrypted services/devices to leave the door cracked open so the government can step inside whenever it feels the need to look around.

    • A quick reminder on HTTPS everywhere

      HTTPS Everywhere! So the plugin says, and now browsers are warning users that sites not implementing https:// are security risks. Using HTTPS everywhere is good advice. And this really means “everywhere”: the home page, everything. Not just the login page, or the page where you accept donations. Everything.

      Implementing HTTPS everywhere has some downsides, as Eric Meyer points out. It breaks caching, which makes the web much slower for people limited to satellite connections (and that’s much of the third world); it’s a problem for people who, for various reasons, have to use older browsers (there are more ancient browsers and operating systems in the world than you would like to think, trust me); domain names and IP address are handled by lower-level protocols that HTTPS doesn’t get to touch, so it’s not as private as one would like; and more. It’s not a great solution, but it’s a necessary one. (Meyer’s article, and the comments following it, are excellent.)

    • Turning off Location History Won’t Help You! Google Will Track You Anyway

      The “location history” option on Google accounts claims in its description to be responsible for collecting data on a user’s movements, but it turns out that switching it off still won’t help if someone wants to track you down via your account.

    • Google tracks your movements, like it or not
    • What you can do to prevent Google—and others—from tracking your phone
    • EBGAP: Error Between Google and Privacy
    • Google tracks users who turn off location history
    • Google can track your location in ways you may not expect. But you can turn it off.
    • Australian parliament will debate bill to weaken encryption by end of 2018

      Australia’s government will debate proposed legislation before the end of this year that could force Apple and other companies to introduce backdoors into their products and services, such as the iPhone or iMessage, under the guise of assisting with national security and law enforcement investigations.

  • Civil Rights/Policing

    • Iowa Supreme Court Thinks Things Are Too Tough For Bad Cops, Adopts Qualified Immunity Defense

      The Iowa Supreme Court has decided to lower standards for law enforcement officers in its state. The ruling [PDF] issued earlier this summer gives state officers the opportunity to dismiss lawsuits against them by asserting qualified immunity. Prior to this decision, there was no qualified immunity defense state actors could raise in court. They were actually forced to actually defend themselves in court, making it easier for plaintiffs’ claims to survive an early motion to dismiss and bringing them closer to justice. (via Bleeding Heartland)

      The case — Baldwin v. City of Estherville — involves an arrest for a crime that didn’t exist. It involves driving an ATV through a city-owned ditch, something that’s illegal under state law but not under the City of Estherville’s laws. An arrest for something that wasn’t actually illegal was followed by this lawsuit. It’s a weird origin for a Fourth Amendment lawsuit, but the outcome makes holding officers accountable for their misdeeds much more difficult with the court’s addition of qualified immunity to local government’s litigation toolbox.

  • Internet Policy/Net Neutrality

    • On Thursday, Ajit Pai Has To Explain Why His FCC Made Up A DDOS Attack And Lied To Congress

      So FCC boss Ajit Pai will need to don some tap-dancing shoes this Thursday, when he’ll be forced to explain to a Senate oversight committee why his agency not only made up a DDOS attack, but lied repeatedly to the press and Congress about it.

      As we recently noted, e-mails obtained by FOIA request have proven that the FCC completely made up a DDOS attack in a bizarre bid to downplay the fact that John Oliver’s bit on net neutrality crashed the agency website last year. A subsequent investigation by the FCC Inspector General confirmed those findings, showing not only that no attack took place, but that numerous FCC staffers misled both Congress and the media when asked about it.

      Pai initially tried to get out ahead of the scandal and IG report by issuing a statement that threw his employees under the bus while playing dumb. According to Pai’s pre-emptive statement, the entire scandal was the fault of the FCC’s since-departed CIO and other employees who mysteriously failed to alert him that this entire shitshow was occurring (you can just smell the ethical leadership here)…

    • Ajit Pai grilled by lawmakers on why FCC spread “myth” of DDoS attack

      Today, four Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee sent a letter to Pai “demanding to know when he and his staff learned that the Commission had provided inaccurate information about why its comment system went down during the net neutrality repeal public comment period,” the Democrats said in an announcement.

    • Court Rejects Ajit Pai’s Bid To Reduce Broadband Subsidies For Tribal Areas

      For a while now we’ve been noting that while Ajit Pai professes to be a huge proponent of “closing the digital divide,” most of his policies are doing the exact opposite. Pai’s attacks on net neutrality, for example, will likely only act to drive up broadband prices for everyone as ISPs enjoy their newfound ability to creatively abusive captive customers in uncompetitive markets. And Pai has repeatedly attempted to fiddle with FCC data collection methodology with an eye toward obfuscating the industry’s competitive failures (be that skyrocketing prices or poor coverage).

      That’s of course when he hasn’t been busy slowly-but-surely gutting programs designed to help bring broadband to the nation’s less affluent areas.

      One of Pai’s core policies has been a relentless attack on the FCC’s Lifeline program. Lifeline was created under the Reagan administration and expanded under the George W. Bush administration, and provides low-income households with a measly $9.25 per month subsidy that low-income homes can use to help pay a tiny fraction of their wireless, phone, or broadband bills (enrolled participants have to chose one). The FCC under former FCC boss Tom Wheeler had voted to expand the service to cover broadband connections, something Pai (ever a champion to the poor) voted down.

      Traditionally this program had broad, bipartisan support and was never deemed even remotely controversial. But ever since Trump and Pai stumbled into town, the current FCC has slowly waged war on the program. For example Pai’s FCC voted 3-2 last November to eliminate a $25 additional Lifeline subsidy for low-income native populations on tribal land. Pai’s FCC also banned smaller mobile carriers from participating in the Lifeline program, a move opposed by even the larger companies (Verizon, AT&T) Pai’s FCC normally nuzzles up to.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Joinder of Inventor/Principal of Patentee to Assertion of Fees for Exceptional Case Liability

      A while back, I suggested here that defendants start thinking, early on, about joining sole-shareholders (and the like) of asset-less patentees if 285 liability was an issue. In a recent case, the district court allowed joinder of such a person, finding he was a necessary party under Rule 19. (I seriously doubt that is correct (what is the claim against the person being joined?), but Genentech managed to convince a judge to join such a person in Phigenix, Inc. v. Genentech, Inc., (N.D. Cal. Aug. 13, 2018) (here). (I’ve also written about counsel’s liability under 285, and the conflicts it can create, here.)

    • France: Upset in practice of the seizure: withdrawal of the seizure order due to lack of impartiality of the patent attorneys

      On March 27th, 2018, the Court of Appeal of Paris issued a decision on withdrawal of the seizure order on the grounds that the principle of impartiality had been violated since the patent attorneys (“CPIs”) assisting the bailiff wrote a report on the probability of the infringement annexed at the seizure request.

      It will thus be advisable to rely on a patent attorney which did not know the case at all in order to practice a seizure without taking the risk of a withdrawal of the order.

      [...]

      The decision of the Court was appealed. We will see if the French Supreme Court will follow the reasoning initiated by the Court of Appeal regarding the lack of impartiality of the patent attorneys who previously acted as experts in the context of the seizure.

      The scope of this decision could be moderated since, in this case, several factual arguments on the drafting conditions of the expert report with the assistance of the seizing party were raised as reported above. In this context, if the patent attorney who prepared a preliminary report for the seizing party had access to some information about the alleged infringing material may not be considered impartial, we may ask ourselves what the measure of impartiality should be. The decision of the Court of Appeal does not set a clear limit on this point; it does of course reiterate that patent attorneys are independent and from that point of view are allowed to assist during seizures.

      Therefore, in order to avoid withdrawal of a seizure order, the seizing party will not refer in its request to a patent attorney who intervened previously as an expert in the same case, e.g. as an expert having participated in a private expert report filed as supporting evidence for obtaining the seizure as in the present case. The risk would be the characterization of the impartiality of the designated patent attorney and, correspondingly, the possible withdrawal of the seizure order. Whether this position would extend to any type of private expertise is unknown; hopefully the Supreme Court will provide guidance.

      We would recommend to use a patent attorney who had no relationship with the seizing party beforehand for assisting during seizures.

    • New survey highlights emerging trends in IP operations management

      The day-to-day tasks of managing a global IP portfolio form the backbone of any IP strategy. The most high-level corporate IP policy can falter if a company lacks robust operations processes for securing and maintaining patents and other rights. In a recent survey, Clarivate Analytics set out to investigate how organisations approach these management tasks, and what challenges they face. This month’s guest piece from the firm breaks down some of the key findings and what they may mean.

    • China: Supreme People’s Court Provides Guidance on Amendment and Inventiveness Evaluation for Markush Claims

      A Markush claim is a type of claim commonly used in chemical and pharmaceutical fields. On December 20, 2017, in Beijing Winsunny Harmony Science & Technology Co., Ltd. v. Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd, (“Daiichi Sankyo Case”), the Supreme People’s Court (“SPC”) resolved a long standing-split among Chinese courts regarding the interpretation and amendment of Markush claims. In combination with examination practice in China, this article will discuss the guidance of the Daiichi Sankyo case and provide strategic suggestions for readers’ reference.

    • Apple’s Declaratory Judgment Backfires, Turns Into $145.1M Damages Verdict Wi-LAN

      Though this is not the only lawsuit fought out between Wi-LAN and Apple, this particular action began in June 2014 when Apple filed a complaint seeking a declaratory judgment of invalidity on the ‘145 and ‘757 patents along with three other Wi-LAN patents.

    • Tesla IP chief jumps to automotive rival

      Jeff Risher has left his post as Tesla’s head of IP to join rival electric car manufacturer Faraday Future as vice president, technology and IP. According to his LinkedIn profile he joined Faraday last month after a little more than two years at Tesla where he was chief IP and litigation counsel. Prior to that he spent almost a decade at Apple, most recently as director of patent licensing and strategy.

    • USA: BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc. v. Aquestive Therapeutics, Inc., United States Court of Appeals, Federal Circuit, No. 2017-1265, 31 July 2018

      The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has granted BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc.’s motion to remand to the Patent Trial and Appeal Board a consolidated appeal of the Board’s final decisions upholding the patentability of three Aquestive Therapeutics patents for water-soluble drug-dosage films incorporating anti-tacking agents.

    • Jury Finding of Willful Infringement Does Not Satisfy Section 287 Notice Requirement

      Following remand, the court granted defendant’s motion for summary judgment to preclude plaintiff from seeking pre-suit damages and rejected plaintiff’s argument that the jury’s willful infringement finding satisfied plaintiff’s obligation to establish actual notice.

    • Design Protection In Europe

      A design is defined in the Community Design regulation and in the Design directive as the outward appearance of a product or a part of a product which results from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. In order to qualify for protection, designs must be new and must have individual character. Furthermore, a design shall not subsist in features of appearance of a product which are solely dictated by its technical function. Designs make a product attractive and appealing; hence they may add significantly to the commercial value of a product and increase its marketability. Design protection is a significant element of IP law. Designs as unique creations with individual character require and deserve protection against imitators just as copyrighted works or trademarks.

    • California jury awards LED company $66m in trade secrets case

      Chinese competitor Elec-Tech found to have stolen trade secrets related to Lumileds technology for making high power LEDs used in flash phones and headlights

    • Copyrights

      • Bruce Lee’s Estate Gets Stiff Roundhouse Kick After Trying To Block Theater Company’s Trademark

        Those steeped in ownership culture often have the wrong idea when it comes to trademark laws. In the minds of some, trademark laws can be used like publicity rights laws, wherein a famous somebody — or that somebody’s heirs — can use that fame to control all uses of references to that somebody for ever and ever. That, of course, is not how trademark laws work. Instead, trademark law is designed to protect the public from confusion by allowing some monopolistic use of names and terms in some markets and only if actual commerce is taking place.

        This is a lesson the management company of the late renowned martial arts star Bruce Lee has now learned the hard way. Bruce Lee Enterprises attempted to both block the trademark registration for production company Barisons in the UK, which applied for a mark covering its forthcoming Jun Fan: the Bruce Lee Musical, and also to apply for a “Jun Fan” mark in the theatrical designation itself. Jun Fan, if you’re not aware, was the birth name of Bruce Lee.

      • Facebook Bans Kodi Boxes And Other Jailbroken Devices

        Kodi has gained quite a notorious reputation as the users continue to stream illegal content from it. Recently, Facebook expressed their criticism of illegal video streaming content by banning Kodi boxes and other jailbroken or loaded devices.

        Adding Kodi to the list of the prohibited content, Facebook has put up a post explicitly stating that posts promoting the sale of illegal video streaming devices, jailbroken devices, wiretapping devices would not be entertained on the platform.

      • SevenTorrents Shuts Down After 10 Years; Transfers Database To WatchSoMuch

        The disappearance of websites in the torrent world is very common. While many services shut down and pirates move on to their alternatives, sometimes sites also transfer their data to other sites.

        A similar retirement development (Via: TF) has recently taken place in the case of SevenTorrents. If you’re only familiar with biggies like The Pirate Bay, YTS, or KAT, let me tell you that SevenTorrents has been around for more than ten years; just last year only, it served more than 5 million visitors.

      • Disney (yes, Disney) declares war on “overzealous copyright holders”

        On the other hand, they’re right, and this is exactly what fair use is for: to allow for third parties to comment on copyrighted works and their creators, especially when the creators object. Sure, maybe Disney could buy licenses to the Michael Jackson videos they’re quoting in this doc, but if the Jackson estate objects because Disney is portraying Jackson in an unflattering light, do we really want to give them a veto? Shouldn’t the discussion of culturally significant figures be the subject of legitimate debate, without partisans (whose own income is dependent on maintaining the reputation of the dead entertainer) being able to decide who can criticize that figure and how?

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GNOME bluefish

Contents

GNU/Linux

Free Software/Open Source

  • Former OSS Executive Eren Niazi Named Open Source Evolution CTO

    Open Source Evolution, visionaries and creators of enterprise custom software, announced today that former OSS founder, Eren Niazi has been named CTO. A 20-year technology veteran, Niazi has been focused on developing custom enterprise open source software for corporate transformations to open source.

    Eren is the original visionary/creator who pioneered the OSS movement and envisioned a world where the enterprises used open source software for large scale data center deployments. Consequently, the OSS technologies Niazi developed have become the model for global industry storage solutions.

  • How To Get An Open Source Developer Job In 2018
  • Tesla to make driverless software open source

    Tesla CEO Elon Musk has told a hacker conference in Las Vegas that he plans to “open source” the software his company uses to secure autonomous-driving features from hacks or takeovers, eventually allowing other carmakers to use it.

    Musk tweeted, “Great Q&A @defcon last night. Thanks for helping make Tesla & SpaceX more secure! Planning to open-source Tesla vehicle security software for free use by other car makers. Extremely important to a safe self-driving future for all.”

  • DarkHydrus Relies on Open-Source Tools for Phishing Attacks [Ed: If there was reliance on something proprietary, the headline would not even mention it; that's because its sole goal is to demonise Open Source, associating it with criminal activity. This actually impacts proprietary software from Microsoft, complete with NSA back doors.]
  • Progress Open Sources ABL Code with Release of Spark Toolkit

    Previously only available from Progress Services, the Spark Toolkit was created in collaboration with the Progress Common Component Specification (CCS) project, a group of Progress® OpenEdge® customers and partners defining a standard set of specifications for the common components for building modern business applications. By engaging the community, Progress has leveraged best practices in the development of these standards-based components and tools to enable new levels of interoperability, flexibility, efficiencies and effectiveness.

    [...]

    It is compatible with the latest version of OpenEdge, 11.7, and is available under Apache License 2.0. More components are expected to be added in the future.

  • Web Browsers

    • Mozilla

      • Rustfmt 1.0 release candidate

        The current version of Rustfmt, 0.99.2, is the first 1.0 release candidate. It is available on nightly and beta (technically 0.99.1 there) channels, and from the 13th September will be available with stable Rust.

        1.0 will be a huge milestone for Rustfmt. As part of it’s stability guarantees, it’s formatting will be frozen (at least until 2.0). That means any sub-optimal formatting still around will be around for a while. So please help test Rustfmt and report any bugs or sub-optimal formatting.

      • Welcome Amy Keating, our incoming General Counsel

        Amy joins Mozilla from Twitter, Inc. where she has been Vice President, Legal and Deputy General Counsel. When she joined Twitter in 2012, she was the first lawyer focused on litigation, building out the functions and supporting the company as both the platform and the employee base grew in the U.S. and internationally. Her role expanded over time to include oversight of Twitter’s product counseling, regulatory, privacy, employment legal, global litigation, and law enforcement legal response functions. Prior to Twitter, Amy was part of Google, Inc.’s legal team and began her legal career as an associate at Bingham McCutchen LLP.

      • Building Extension APIs with Friend of Add-ons Oriol Brufau

        Please meet Oriol Brufau, our newest Friend of Add-ons! Oriol is one of 23 volunteer community members who have landed code for the WebExtensions API in Firefox since the technology was first introduced in 2015. You may be familiar with his numerous contributions if you have set a specific badge text color for your browserAction, highlighted multiple tabs with the tabs.query API, or have seen your extension’s icon display correctly in about:addons.

        While our small engineering team doesn’t always have the resources to implement every approved request for new or enhanced WebExtensions APIs, the involvement of community members like Oriol adds considerable depth and breadth to technology that affects millions of users. However, the Firefox code base is large, complex, and full of dependencies. Contributing code to the browser can be difficult even for experienced developers.

        As part of celebrating Oriol’s achievements, we asked him to share his experience contributing to the WebExtensions API with the hope that it will be helpful for other developers interested in landing more APIs in Firefox.

      • L10N Report: August Edition

        After a quick pause in July, your primary source of localization information at Mozilla is back!

  • Oracle/Java/LibreOffice

    • This powerful free office program can replace Microsoft Office

      Even better, as we said, LibreOffice can open and edit the documents you made in Office and can save new files in Office formats. LibreOffice is also compatible with the most popular document formats, not just Office documents. It’s also compatible with OpenDocument Format (ODF) and you can even sign PDF documents without having to involve your printer!

  • Pseudo-Open Source (Openwashing)

  • Openness/Sharing/Collaboration

    • Musical Space: Open Source Music

      The term “open source” was coined 20 years ago this month by some software engineers who had the radical idea of allowing their code to be freely shared, copied and modified by anyone else. They realized they could make more money by giving away their product instead of selling it, and selling the support services instead. The open source model is a growing part of the arts, and nowhere more than in music. Recordings make so little money that creators now offer them for free and make their money from live shows instead.

    • Open Hardware/Modding

      • Hobbyist 3D prints open source CNC machine for under $200

        Hobbyist and Reddit 3D printing community contributor Marioarm has built an “almost fully” 3D printed CNC machine for milling electronic chipboards.

        Marioarm built the Cyclone PCB CNC machine with 3D printed parts downloaded from file sharing sites such as Thingiverse and the GitHub repository Cyclone PCB Factory. With minimal, prefabricated parts, the project in total cost Marioarm under $200 to build.

  • Programming/Development

    • [Older] Julia 1.0 release Opens the Doors for a Connected World

      Today Julia Computing announced the Julia 1.0 programming language release, “the most important Julia milestone since Julia was introduced in February 2012.” As the first complete, reliable, stable and forward-compatible Julia release, version 1.0 is the fastest, simplest and most productive open-source programming language for scientific, numeric and mathematical computing.

    • This Week in Rust 247
    • BARR-C Aims to Make Us Better Programmers

      Look up “panacea” and you’ll find a bunch of C programming tools. Everyone and his dog has ideas about how to create better, more reliable C code. Use an ISO-certified compiler. Follow MISRA C guidelines. Write the comments first. Agile Programming. Energy crystals. The late-night remedies never end.

      Or, you could learn from the master. Michael Barr does embedded programming. He’s got a Masters in electrical engineering; was an adjunct professor of EE/CS; was Editor-in-Chief of Embedded Systems Programming magazine; founded consulting company Netrino to teach people how to write better code; then founded Barr Group to do it again. The man knows a few things about writing embedded software, mostly by watching his clients and students doing it badly. There’s no substitute for experience, and this guy has collected decades worth of it.

      So it’s no surprise that he’s come up with his own little black book of programming pointers. These are the rules, guidelines, and suggestions gleaned from years of reviewing other peoples’ bad code and then fixing it. Best of all, a PDF download of the book is free. If you’re a traditionalist, you can buy the paperback version from Amazon.

Leftovers

  • In Defense Of Slow News

    Many years back, I remember seeing Michael Arrington, the founder of TechCrunch, being interviewed about that site (which at the time was on its way to becoming the first “mainstream” tech news blog). I’m paraphrasing, and possibly misremembering, but what stuck with me was that he suggested that, as a blog, you basically had to focus on one of three things to succeed: being first, being funny, or being insightful. And he had chosen “being first” as the strategy for TechCrunch — trying to break news as quickly as possible. And while that makes sense as a business strategy if you can do it, it had absolutely no appeal to me for how we ran Techdirt. We always hoped to focus on adding more insight into various issues, than breaking news. That’s not to say we don’t break news every so often, but it’s certainly not the focus.

  • Health/Nutrition

    • Flint, Michigan Still Has Polluted Water: Here’s How To Help

      Perhaps the biggest lesson to take away from Flint’s water crisis is this: Don’t for a second think this couldn’t have been your town. This didn’t happen on some faraway island or in a Third World country, but right in America’s own backyard. “From every objective measure that is out there, Flint’s water is like any other US city with old lead pipes,” adds Virginia Tech’s Siddhartha Roy, one of the researchers who brought the scandal to light. So take note and stay in the fight, because if you don’t and your elected officials one day decide that your water looking and smelling like orc blood isn’t their problem, you’ll spend a really long time picking chunks out of your teeth after every brushing. And if that sentence isn’t enough for you to take an interest in local politics, we don’t know what will.

    • Illinois Lawmakers Search for Solutions for Children Stuck in Psychiatric Hospitals

      Illinois lawmakers Tuesday heard testimony from nearly a dozen doctors and child welfare advocates describing circumstances facing children who languish in psychiatric hospitals even after they had been cleared for discharge — circumstances so harrowing that some children chose jail over another night at a psychiatric facility.

      State Sen. Julie Morrison, a Democrat from Deerfield, called for the Senate Human Services Committee hearing following a ProPublica Illinois investigation that revealed that hundreds of children in care of the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services spent weeks or months at a time locked in psychiatric hospitals after doctors had cleared them for release.

      The investigation, published in June, found that children in DCFS care were trapped inside psychiatric hospitals between 2015 and 2017 for a total of more than 27,000 days beyond what was medically necessary. During that time, the state spent nearly $7 million on unnecessary psychiatric care for children as young as 4.

      And the problem, ProPublica Illinois found, has only been getting worse. In 2014, only 88 psychiatric admissions were not medically needed compared with 301 last year.

  • Security

  • Defence/Aggression

    • How Militaries Should Plan for AI

      Today we are publishing a new EFF white paper, The Cautious Path to Strategic Advantage: How Militaries Should Plan for AI. This paper analyzes the risks and implications of military AI projects in the wake of Google’s decision to discontinue AI assistance to the US military’s drone program and adopt AI ethics principles that preclude many forms of military work.

      The key audiences for this paper are military planners and defense contractors, who may find the objections to military uses of AI from Google’s employees and others in Silicon Valley hard to understand. Hoping to bridge the gap, we urge our key audiences to consider several guiding questions. What are the major technical and strategic risks of applying current machine learning methods in weapons systems or military command and control? What are the appropriate responses that states and militaries can adopt in response? What kinds of AI are safe for military use, and what kinds aren’t?

      Militaries must make sure they don’t buy into the machine learning hype while missing the warning label.

      We are at a critical juncture. Machine learning technologies have received incredible hype, and indeed they have made exciting progress on some fronts, but they remain brittle, subject to novel failure modes, and vulnerable to diverse forms of adversarial attack and manipulation. They also lack the basic forms of common sense and judgment on which humans usually rely.

    • ‘Do We Deserve to Kill?’ The Answer Is ‘No’ After Nebraska’s Latest Execution

      Nebraska’s fentanyl execution was only possible because the state delayed Moore’s execution for nearly four decades — depleting his will to fight.

      “The death penalty is not about whether people deserve to die for the crimes they commit,” as Bryan Stevenson, executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, frequently explains. “The real question of capital punishment in this country is, ‘Do we deserve to kill?’” For those of us who are most familiar with the legal deficiencies and human cruelties of capital punishment, the answer is a resounding no.

      Nebraska’s execution of Carey Dean Moore this morning proves the point.

      As a society, we have determined that a death sentence requires that our process for determining who is guilty, for determining whom should be executed, and for executing humanely are transparent and above reproach. By any standard, Nebraska should not have had the authority to kill Moore today with an experimental fentanyl drug protocol.

      Moore’s case is remarkable for several reasons. First, he has spent 38 years on death row, the longest known period between death sentence and execution in American history. Second, six years ago, he gave up all appeals and refused to fight for his life.

      On the surface, it may appear that Nebraska could execute Mr. Moore without judicial oversight or safeguards because Moore agreed to be executed. But looking more deeply, we know Moore’s decision to stop fighting for his life is the result of Nebraska holding him for decades on death row without executing him.

    • Defense Inspector General to Investigate Military’s Toxic Open Burning

      The Department of Defense’s internal watchdog is launching an investigation into the military’s heavily polluting practice of open burning and detonating hazardous explosive materials on its properties, as well as its frequent reliance on federal contractors to carry out that work.

      The inquiry, announced Aug. 10 on the website of the department’s Office of Inspector General, will examine whether the department’s practices are legal, and whether the contractors charged with handling dangerous materials — often close to the public — have proper oversight.

      “Robust oversight of these contractors is essential for protecting the health and well-being of all who work and live near these installations,” Democratic Rep. Carol Shea-Porter of New Hampshire wrote to ProPublica in an email. “But it is clear that this oversight did not take place.”

    • 10 Questions on Secret Israeli Report Over 2014 Killing of Four Children on Gaza Beach

      Findings raise questions about decision-making process that led to shooting at children when they didn’t pose a threat. This requires clarification on use of drones, IDF’s open-fire policy and responsibility of those involved

    • Police take former MEIO director- general’s statement over CIA letter

      Police have taken the statement of the former Malaysian External Intelligence Organisation (MEIO) director-general Datuk Hasanah Abdul Hamid on a letter she wrote to the United States’ Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

      Without revealing when Hasanah’s statement was taken, the Inspector-General of Police (IGP) Tan Sri Mohamad Fuzi Harun said police had also called several other MEIO officers to assist investigations.

      He said police would also be taking the statements of several MEIO officers in Washington.

      “We will later send the investigation papers to the deputy public prosecutor for further action,” he told reporters after Bukit Aman Monthly Assembly here yesterday.

  • Transparency/Investigative Reporting

    • DNC lawsuit against WikiLeaks served via Twitter

      The Democratic National Committee has used Twitter to serve a lawsuit against WikiLeaks that accuses the website of participating in a conspiracy to hack into DNC emails and denigrate Hillary Clinton.

      U.S. District Judge John Koeltl of Manhattan granted the motion to serve via Twitter and mail on Aug. 6. The DNC’s law firm, Cohen Milstein, served the suit on Aug. 10 through a Twitter account that was apparently created for that purpose, report CBS News, Gizmodo and TechCrunch.

      The DNC had told the court in a July 20 motion to allow the alternate service that WikiLeaks “has more of a virtual than a physical presence.” The motion cited a California case in which a federal court allowed service via Twitter of a suit against a Kuwaiti national accused of financing ISIS activities.

      The DNC had not been able to serve the lawsuit by other methods, the motion said. DNC lawyers tried sending emails to an address provided on the WikiLeaks website and contacting lawyers who had represented WikiLeaks in other matters. The emails were returned as undeliverable, and the lawyers who responded said they no longer represented WikiLeaks and were not authorized to accept service.

    • Mueller investigation seeks to implicate WikiLeaks and Julian Assange in “Russian interference”

      The investigation headed by Special Counsel and former FBI director Robert Mueller into alleged “collusion” between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential election has entered a new stage.

      Mueller is seeking to substantiate the case he advanced last month—as part of the indictment of 12 Russian intelligence officers—that Trump campaign insider Roger Stone and WikiLeaks editor Julian Assange were part of a conspiracy to hack and publish emails sent by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairperson John Podesta (see: “In run-up to Trump-Putin summit, Mueller charges 12 Russian officers with DNC email hack”).

  • Finance

    • ‘There is a Strong Reason for All Americans to Feel more Economically Insecure than they Did Before the Great Recession’

      Last September, elite media were heralding numbers suggesting that incomes were up among middle class Americans, but tiptoeing around the fact that the rising tide was not lifting all boats. Dedrick Asante-Muhammad is Senior Fellow, Racial Wealth Divide, at the group Prosperity Now. He told CounterSpin about a report he co-authored, called The Road to Zero Wealth: How the Racial Wealth Divide Is Hollowing Out America’s Middle Class, from Prosperity Now and the Institute for Policy Studies. I asked why they chose to focus on racial disparities in wealth.

    • Why Isn’t Blockchain Technology Adoption Soaring?
    • Almost 80% of US workers live from paycheck to paycheck. Here’s why

      But the official rate hides more troubling realities: legions of college grads overqualified for their jobs, a growing number of contract workers with no job security, and an army of part-time workers desperate for full-time jobs. Almost 80% of Americans say they live from paycheck to paycheck, many not knowing how big their next one will be.

      Blanketing all of this are stagnant wages and vanishing job benefits. The typical American worker now earns around $44,500 a year, not much more than what the typical worker earned in 40 years ago, adjusted for inflation. Although the US economy continues to grow, most of the gains have been going to a relatively few top executives of large companies, financiers, and inventors and owners of digital devices.

  • AstroTurf/Lobbying/Politics

    • If Collusion Is in the Eye of the Beholder…

      …then the person observing gets to decide what collusion is, right?

    • ‘People are terrified’: Trump staffers live in fear of Omarosa’s next tape

      A daily trickle of revealing internal conversations between staffers. Growing anxiety about what one might have once said. No sense of how long it will go on.

      Omarosa Manigault Newman’s slow release of secretly taped conversations from inside the Trump campaign and White House is having the same effect on staffers as the daily dumps from WikiLeaks had on Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign, when chairman John Podesta’s emails were trickled out during the final stretch of the race.

    • Trump-Omarosa feud rooted in her allegations of racism
    • The Latest: Omarosa tells AP: ‘I will not be silenced’

      Omarosa Manigault Newman declared “I will not be silenced” by the Trump campaign.

      Manigault Newman spoke to The Associated Press hours after the president’s campaign announced it was filing an arbitration action against the former aide alleging she broke a secrecy agreement.

      In an interview with AP, Manigault Newman said she believes the action was intended to keep her from telling her story. She says she “will not be intimidated.”

  • Censorship/Free Speech

  • Privacy/Surveillance

    • What You Should Know Before Buying a Wired Security Camera System

      One huge benefit of having a wired security camera system is that you don’t need to connect it to the internet to use it—unlike most Wi-Fi cams, which require an internet connection to do anything.

      The downside to an off-the-grid camera system, however, is that you won’t be able to access it remotely from your phone if you’re away from home. Instead, you can only view and manage your camera system from the DVR box and the connected monitor and peripherals.

    • Australian Gov’t Floats New Batch Of Compelled Access Legislation With An Eye On Encryption

      The Australian government is looking to revamp its compelled access laws to fight encryption and other assorted technological advances apparently only capable of being used for evil. It’s getting pretty damn dark Down Under, according to the Department of Home Affairs’ announcement of the pending legislation.

      [...]

      There’s the limitation of lawmaking. Lawbreakers break laws and they’re not going to stop just because you’ve told them not to with a government mandate. Legislation [PDF] like this does little more than make life more difficult for service providers and device makers while undermining the privacy and security of millions of law-abiding citizens.

      The explanation sheet [PDF] notes the government is not seeking to mandate encryption backdoors. That being said, it would like providers of encrypted services/devices to leave the door cracked open so the government can step inside whenever it feels the need to look around.

    • A quick reminder on HTTPS everywhere

      HTTPS Everywhere! So the plugin says, and now browsers are warning users that sites not implementing https:// are security risks. Using HTTPS everywhere is good advice. And this really means “everywhere”: the home page, everything. Not just the login page, or the page where you accept donations. Everything.

      Implementing HTTPS everywhere has some downsides, as Eric Meyer points out. It breaks caching, which makes the web much slower for people limited to satellite connections (and that’s much of the third world); it’s a problem for people who, for various reasons, have to use older browsers (there are more ancient browsers and operating systems in the world than you would like to think, trust me); domain names and IP address are handled by lower-level protocols that HTTPS doesn’t get to touch, so it’s not as private as one would like; and more. It’s not a great solution, but it’s a necessary one. (Meyer’s article, and the comments following it, are excellent.)

    • Turning off Location History Won’t Help You! Google Will Track You Anyway

      The “location history” option on Google accounts claims in its description to be responsible for collecting data on a user’s movements, but it turns out that switching it off still won’t help if someone wants to track you down via your account.

    • Google tracks your movements, like it or not
    • What you can do to prevent Google—and others—from tracking your phone
    • EBGAP: Error Between Google and Privacy
    • Google tracks users who turn off location history
    • Google can track your location in ways you may not expect. But you can turn it off.
    • Australian parliament will debate bill to weaken encryption by end of 2018

      Australia’s government will debate proposed legislation before the end of this year that could force Apple and other companies to introduce backdoors into their products and services, such as the iPhone or iMessage, under the guise of assisting with national security and law enforcement investigations.

  • Civil Rights/Policing

    • Iowa Supreme Court Thinks Things Are Too Tough For Bad Cops, Adopts Qualified Immunity Defense

      The Iowa Supreme Court has decided to lower standards for law enforcement officers in its state. The ruling [PDF] issued earlier this summer gives state officers the opportunity to dismiss lawsuits against them by asserting qualified immunity. Prior to this decision, there was no qualified immunity defense state actors could raise in court. They were actually forced to actually defend themselves in court, making it easier for plaintiffs’ claims to survive an early motion to dismiss and bringing them closer to justice. (via Bleeding Heartland)

      The case — Baldwin v. City of Estherville — involves an arrest for a crime that didn’t exist. It involves driving an ATV through a city-owned ditch, something that’s illegal under state law but not under the City of Estherville’s laws. An arrest for something that wasn’t actually illegal was followed by this lawsuit. It’s a weird origin for a Fourth Amendment lawsuit, but the outcome makes holding officers accountable for their misdeeds much more difficult with the court’s addition of qualified immunity to local government’s litigation toolbox.

  • Internet Policy/Net Neutrality

    • On Thursday, Ajit Pai Has To Explain Why His FCC Made Up A DDOS Attack And Lied To Congress

      So FCC boss Ajit Pai will need to don some tap-dancing shoes this Thursday, when he’ll be forced to explain to a Senate oversight committee why his agency not only made up a DDOS attack, but lied repeatedly to the press and Congress about it.

      As we recently noted, e-mails obtained by FOIA request have proven that the FCC completely made up a DDOS attack in a bizarre bid to downplay the fact that John Oliver’s bit on net neutrality crashed the agency website last year. A subsequent investigation by the FCC Inspector General confirmed those findings, showing not only that no attack took place, but that numerous FCC staffers misled both Congress and the media when asked about it.

      Pai initially tried to get out ahead of the scandal and IG report by issuing a statement that threw his employees under the bus while playing dumb. According to Pai’s pre-emptive statement, the entire scandal was the fault of the FCC’s since-departed CIO and other employees who mysteriously failed to alert him that this entire shitshow was occurring (you can just smell the ethical leadership here)…

    • Ajit Pai grilled by lawmakers on why FCC spread “myth” of DDoS attack

      Today, four Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee sent a letter to Pai “demanding to know when he and his staff learned that the Commission had provided inaccurate information about why its comment system went down during the net neutrality repeal public comment period,” the Democrats said in an announcement.

    • Court Rejects Ajit Pai’s Bid To Reduce Broadband Subsidies For Tribal Areas

      For a while now we’ve been noting that while Ajit Pai professes to be a huge proponent of “closing the digital divide,” most of his policies are doing the exact opposite. Pai’s attacks on net neutrality, for example, will likely only act to drive up broadband prices for everyone as ISPs enjoy their newfound ability to creatively abusive captive customers in uncompetitive markets. And Pai has repeatedly attempted to fiddle with FCC data collection methodology with an eye toward obfuscating the industry’s competitive failures (be that skyrocketing prices or poor coverage).

      That’s of course when he hasn’t been busy slowly-but-surely gutting programs designed to help bring broadband to the nation’s less affluent areas.

      One of Pai’s core policies has been a relentless attack on the FCC’s Lifeline program. Lifeline was created under the Reagan administration and expanded under the George W. Bush administration, and provides low-income households with a measly $9.25 per month subsidy that low-income homes can use to help pay a tiny fraction of their wireless, phone, or broadband bills (enrolled participants have to chose one). The FCC under former FCC boss Tom Wheeler had voted to expand the service to cover broadband connections, something Pai (ever a champion to the poor) voted down.

      Traditionally this program had broad, bipartisan support and was never deemed even remotely controversial. But ever since Trump and Pai stumbled into town, the current FCC has slowly waged war on the program. For example Pai’s FCC voted 3-2 last November to eliminate a $25 additional Lifeline subsidy for low-income native populations on tribal land. Pai’s FCC also banned smaller mobile carriers from participating in the Lifeline program, a move opposed by even the larger companies (Verizon, AT&T) Pai’s FCC normally nuzzles up to.

  • Intellectual Monopolies

    • Joinder of Inventor/Principal of Patentee to Assertion of Fees for Exceptional Case Liability

      A while back, I suggested here that defendants start thinking, early on, about joining sole-shareholders (and the like) of asset-less patentees if 285 liability was an issue. In a recent case, the district court allowed joinder of such a person, finding he was a necessary party under Rule 19. (I seriously doubt that is correct (what is the claim against the person being joined?), but Genentech managed to convince a judge to join such a person in Phigenix, Inc. v. Genentech, Inc., (N.D. Cal. Aug. 13, 2018) (here). (I’ve also written about counsel’s liability under 285, and the conflicts it can create, here.)

    • France: Upset in practice of the seizure: withdrawal of the seizure order due to lack of impartiality of the patent attorneys

      On March 27th, 2018, the Court of Appeal of Paris issued a decision on withdrawal of the seizure order on the grounds that the principle of impartiality had been violated since the patent attorneys (“CPIs”) assisting the bailiff wrote a report on the probability of the infringement annexed at the seizure request.

      It will thus be advisable to rely on a patent attorney which did not know the case at all in order to practice a seizure without taking the risk of a withdrawal of the order.

      [...]

      The decision of the Court was appealed. We will see if the French Supreme Court will follow the reasoning initiated by the Court of Appeal regarding the lack of impartiality of the patent attorneys who previously acted as experts in the context of the seizure.

      The scope of this decision could be moderated since, in this case, several factual arguments on the drafting conditions of the expert report with the assistance of the seizing party were raised as reported above. In this context, if the patent attorney who prepared a preliminary report for the seizing party had access to some information about the alleged infringing material may not be considered impartial, we may ask ourselves what the measure of impartiality should be. The decision of the Court of Appeal does not set a clear limit on this point; it does of course reiterate that patent attorneys are independent and from that point of view are allowed to assist during seizures.

      Therefore, in order to avoid withdrawal of a seizure order, the seizing party will not refer in its request to a patent attorney who intervened previously as an expert in the same case, e.g. as an expert having participated in a private expert report filed as supporting evidence for obtaining the seizure as in the present case. The risk would be the characterization of the impartiality of the designated patent attorney and, correspondingly, the possible withdrawal of the seizure order. Whether this position would extend to any type of private expertise is unknown; hopefully the Supreme Court will provide guidance.

      We would recommend to use a patent attorney who had no relationship with the seizing party beforehand for assisting during seizures.

    • New survey highlights emerging trends in IP operations management

      The day-to-day tasks of managing a global IP portfolio form the backbone of any IP strategy. The most high-level corporate IP policy can falter if a company lacks robust operations processes for securing and maintaining patents and other rights. In a recent survey, Clarivate Analytics set out to investigate how organisations approach these management tasks, and what challenges they face. This month’s guest piece from the firm breaks down some of the key findings and what they may mean.

    • China: Supreme People’s Court Provides Guidance on Amendment and Inventiveness Evaluation for Markush Claims

      A Markush claim is a type of claim commonly used in chemical and pharmaceutical fields. On December 20, 2017, in Beijing Winsunny Harmony Science & Technology Co., Ltd. v. Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd, (“Daiichi Sankyo Case”), the Supreme People’s Court (“SPC”) resolved a long standing-split among Chinese courts regarding the interpretation and amendment of Markush claims. In combination with examination practice in China, this article will discuss the guidance of the Daiichi Sankyo case and provide strategic suggestions for readers’ reference.

    • Apple’s Declaratory Judgment Backfires, Turns Into $145.1M Damages Verdict Wi-LAN

      Though this is not the only lawsuit fought out between Wi-LAN and Apple, this particular action began in June 2014 when Apple filed a complaint seeking a declaratory judgment of invalidity on the ‘145 and ‘757 patents along with three other Wi-LAN patents.

    • Tesla IP chief jumps to automotive rival

      Jeff Risher has left his post as Tesla’s head of IP to join rival electric car manufacturer Faraday Future as vice president, technology and IP. According to his LinkedIn profile he joined Faraday last month after a little more than two years at Tesla where he was chief IP and litigation counsel. Prior to that he spent almost a decade at Apple, most recently as director of patent licensing and strategy.

    • USA: BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc. v. Aquestive Therapeutics, Inc., United States Court of Appeals, Federal Circuit, No. 2017-1265, 31 July 2018

      The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit has granted BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc.’s motion to remand to the Patent Trial and Appeal Board a consolidated appeal of the Board’s final decisions upholding the patentability of three Aquestive Therapeutics patents for water-soluble drug-dosage films incorporating anti-tacking agents.

    • Jury Finding of Willful Infringement Does Not Satisfy Section 287 Notice Requirement

      Following remand, the court granted defendant’s motion for summary judgment to preclude plaintiff from seeking pre-suit damages and rejected plaintiff’s argument that the jury’s willful infringement finding satisfied plaintiff’s obligation to establish actual notice.

    • Design Protection In Europe

      A design is defined in the Community Design regulation and in the Design directive as the outward appearance of a product or a part of a product which results from the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture, materials and/or its ornamentation. In order to qualify for protection, designs must be new and must have individual character. Furthermore, a design shall not subsist in features of appearance of a product which are solely dictated by its technical function. Designs make a product attractive and appealing; hence they may add significantly to the commercial value of a product and increase its marketability. Design protection is a significant element of IP law. Designs as unique creations with individual character require and deserve protection against imitators just as copyrighted works or trademarks.

    • California jury awards LED company $66m in trade secrets case

      Chinese competitor Elec-Tech found to have stolen trade secrets related to Lumileds technology for making high power LEDs used in flash phones and headlights

    • Copyrights

      • Bruce Lee’s Estate Gets Stiff Roundhouse Kick After Trying To Block Theater Company’s Trademark

        Those steeped in ownership culture often have the wrong idea when it comes to trademark laws. In the minds of some, trademark laws can be used like publicity rights laws, wherein a famous somebody — or that somebody’s heirs — can use that fame to control all uses of references to that somebody for ever and ever. That, of course, is not how trademark laws work. Instead, trademark law is designed to protect the public from confusion by allowing some monopolistic use of names and terms in some markets and only if actual commerce is taking place.

        This is a lesson the management company of the late renowned martial arts star Bruce Lee has now learned the hard way. Bruce Lee Enterprises attempted to both block the trademark registration for production company Barisons in the UK, which applied for a mark covering its forthcoming Jun Fan: the Bruce Lee Musical, and also to apply for a “Jun Fan” mark in the theatrical designation itself. Jun Fan, if you’re not aware, was the birth name of Bruce Lee.

      • Facebook Bans Kodi Boxes And Other Jailbroken Devices

        Kodi has gained quite a notorious reputation as the users continue to stream illegal content from it. Recently, Facebook expressed their criticism of illegal video streaming content by banning Kodi boxes and other jailbroken or loaded devices.

        Adding Kodi to the list of the prohibited content, Facebook has put up a post explicitly stating that posts promoting the sale of illegal video streaming devices, jailbroken devices, wiretapping devices would not be entertained on the platform.

      • SevenTorrents Shuts Down After 10 Years; Transfers Database To WatchSoMuch

        The disappearance of websites in the torrent world is very common. While many services shut down and pirates move on to their alternatives, sometimes sites also transfer their data to other sites.

        A similar retirement development (Via: TF) has recently taken place in the case of SevenTorrents. If you’re only familiar with biggies like The Pirate Bay, YTS, or KAT, let me tell you that SevenTorrents has been around for more than ten years; just last year only, it served more than 5 million visitors.

      • Disney (yes, Disney) declares war on “overzealous copyright holders”

        On the other hand, they’re right, and this is exactly what fair use is for: to allow for third parties to comment on copyrighted works and their creators, especially when the creators object. Sure, maybe Disney could buy licenses to the Michael Jackson videos they’re quoting in this doc, but if the Jackson estate objects because Disney is portraying Jackson in an unflattering light, do we really want to give them a veto? Shouldn’t the discussion of culturally significant figures be the subject of legitimate debate, without partisans (whose own income is dependent on maintaining the reputation of the dead entertainer) being able to decide who can criticize that figure and how?

]]>
Techrights
<![CDATA[5 of the Best Linux Educational Software and Games for Kids]]> https://www.maketecheasier.com/5-best-linux-software-packages-for-kids/ https://www.maketecheasier.com/5-best-linux-software-packages-for-kids/ Wed, 15 Aug 2018 16:20:20 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[How to limit CPU usage with CPULimit on Ubuntu Linux]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/q6DNgzm8nPQ/how-to-limit-cpu-usage-with-cpulimit-on-ubuntu-linux-180814013004.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/q6DNgzm8nPQ/how-to-limit-cpu-usage-with-cpulimit-on-ubuntu-linux-180814013004.html Wed, 15 Aug 2018 16:00:00 +0000  Learn how to limit CPU usage in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

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 Learn how to limit CPU usage in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

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Linux Today
<![CDATA[The road to bipedalism wasn’t straight and narrow]]> https://arstechnica.com/?p=1358989 https://arstechnica.com/?p=1358989 Wed, 15 Aug 2018 15:55:37 +0000

Enlarge / The 3.32 million-year-old foot from an Australopithecus afarensis toddler from different angles on the left, next to the fossil remains of an adult Australopithecus foot on the right. Credit: Jeremy DeSilva & Cody Prang (credit: Jeremy DeSilva and Cody Prang)

Early hominins' four smaller toes had adapted to bipedal walking by around 4.4 million years ago, but the big toe remained better-suited to grasping and climbing for a few million more years, until some time early in the evolution of our genus, Homo. That’s the conclusion of a new study by Stony Brook University anthropologist Peter Fernandez and his colleagues, who studied the size and shape of the metatarsals (the bones of the mid-foot) in modern humans, fossil hominins, and an assortment of monkeys and apes.

Spring in our step

Primate feet evolved mostly to grasp while climbing, which is why chimpanzees have more flexible feet than humans and why their big toes are opposable, like our thumbs. Humans—and our hominin predecessors—are the weird exceptions in the primate family tree, with the basic architecture of our feet adapted to bear weight while walking.

Some of those adaptations, like the one Fernandez and his colleagues studied, look pretty subtle to anyone who is not a specialist in primate foot anatomy. Their study focused on how much the head of the metatarsal protrudes toward the top of the foot, sticking out above the shaft of the bone like a dome, at the joint with the phalanx (one of the bones that makes up the toes) at the base of the toe.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / The 3.32 million-year-old foot from an Australopithecus afarensis toddler from different angles on the left, next to the fossil remains of an adult Australopithecus foot on the right. Credit: Jeremy DeSilva & Cody Prang (credit: Jeremy DeSilva and Cody Prang)

Early hominins' four smaller toes had adapted to bipedal walking by around 4.4 million years ago, but the big toe remained better-suited to grasping and climbing for a few million more years, until some time early in the evolution of our genus, Homo. That’s the conclusion of a new study by Stony Brook University anthropologist Peter Fernandez and his colleagues, who studied the size and shape of the metatarsals (the bones of the mid-foot) in modern humans, fossil hominins, and an assortment of monkeys and apes.

Spring in our step

Primate feet evolved mostly to grasp while climbing, which is why chimpanzees have more flexible feet than humans and why their big toes are opposable, like our thumbs. Humans—and our hominin predecessors—are the weird exceptions in the primate family tree, with the basic architecture of our feet adapted to bear weight while walking.

Some of those adaptations, like the one Fernandez and his colleagues studied, look pretty subtle to anyone who is not a specialist in primate foot anatomy. Their study focused on how much the head of the metatarsal protrudes toward the top of the foot, sticking out above the shaft of the bone like a dome, at the joint with the phalanx (one of the bones that makes up the toes) at the base of the toe.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ars Technica News Feed
<![CDATA[How to Install Prometheus and node_exporter on CentOS 7]]> https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/how-to-install-prometheus-and-node-exporter-on-centos-7/ https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/how-to-install-prometheus-and-node-exporter-on-centos-7/ Wed, 15 Aug 2018 15:50:16 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[Andres Rodriguez: MAAS 2.4.1 released!]]> http://www.roaksoax.com/2018/08/maas-2-4-1-released http://www.roaksoax.com/2018/08/maas-2-4-1-released Wed, 15 Aug 2018 15:20:36 +0000 Hello MAASTers

MAAS 2.4.1 has now been released and it is a bug fix release. Please see more details in discourse.maas.io [1].

[1]: https://discourse.maas.io/t/maas-2-4-1-released/148

]]>
Hello MAASTers

MAAS 2.4.1 has now been released and it is a bug fix release. Please see more details in discourse.maas.io [1].

[1]: https://discourse.maas.io/t/maas-2-4-1-released/148

]]>
Planet Ubuntu
<![CDATA[Git Basics – Git Series Part 1]]> http://www.linuxandubuntu.com/home/git-basics-git-series-part-1 http://www.linuxandubuntu.com/home/git-basics-git-series-part-1 Wed, 15 Aug 2018 15:20:23 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[Valve seems to be working on tools to get Windows games running on Linux]]> https://arstechnica.com/?p=1359213 https://arstechnica.com/?p=1359213 Wed, 15 Aug 2018 15:06:30 +0000

That Steam logo is the only outward sign that this is a Steam Machine and not an Alienware Alpha.

Valve appears to be working on a set of "compatibility tools," called Steam Play, that would allow at least some Windows-based titles to run on Linux-based SteamOS systems.

Yesterday, Reddit users noticed that Steam's GUI files (as captured by SteamDB's Steam Tracker) include a hidden section with unused text related to the unannounced Steam Play system. According to that text, "Steam Play will automatically install compatibility tools that allow you to play games from your library that were built for other operating systems."

Other unused text in the that GUI file suggests Steam Play will offer official compatibility with "supported tiles" while also letting users test compatibility for "games in your library that have not been verified with a supported compatibility tool." That latter use comes with a warning that "this may not work as expected, and can cause issues with your games, including crashes and breaking save games."

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

]]>

That Steam logo is the only outward sign that this is a Steam Machine and not an Alienware Alpha.

Valve appears to be working on a set of "compatibility tools," called Steam Play, that would allow at least some Windows-based titles to run on Linux-based SteamOS systems.

Yesterday, Reddit users noticed that Steam's GUI files (as captured by SteamDB's Steam Tracker) include a hidden section with unused text related to the unannounced Steam Play system. According to that text, "Steam Play will automatically install compatibility tools that allow you to play games from your library that were built for other operating systems."

Other unused text in the that GUI file suggests Steam Play will offer official compatibility with "supported tiles" while also letting users test compatibility for "games in your library that have not been verified with a supported compatibility tool." That latter use comes with a warning that "this may not work as expected, and can cause issues with your games, including crashes and breaking save games."

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments

]]>
Ars Technica News Feed
<![CDATA[How To Install Asterisk on CentOS 7]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/W1LJ-dORNkw/how-to-install-asterisk-on-centos-7-180814000525.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/W1LJ-dORNkw/how-to-install-asterisk-on-centos-7-180814000525.html Wed, 15 Aug 2018 15:00:00 +0000 Asterisk is the most popular and widely adopted open source PBX platform that powers IP PBX systems, conference servers and VoIP gateways.

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Asterisk is the most popular and widely adopted open source PBX platform that powers IP PBX systems, conference servers and VoIP gateways.

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Linux Today
<![CDATA[Security updates for Wednesday]]> https://lwn.net/Articles/762706/rss https://lwn.net/Articles/762706/rss Wed, 15 Aug 2018 14:55:47 +0000 CentOS (kernel), Debian (kernel, linux-4.9, postgresql-9.4, and ruby-zip), Fedora (cgit, firefox, knot-resolver, mingw-LibRaw, php-symfony, php-symfony3, php-symfony4, php-zendframework-zend-diactoros, php-zendframework-zend-feed, php-zendframework-zend-http, python2-django1.11, quazip, sox, and thunderbird-enigmail), openSUSE (python-Django and seamonkey), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (kernel, kernel-rt, and redhat-virtualization-host), Scientific Linux (kernel), Slackware (openssl), SUSE (clamav, firefox, kernel, and samba), and Ubuntu (kernel, libxml2, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-hwe, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-lts-trusty, linux-lts-xenial, linux-aws, linux-raspi2, and samba).]]> CentOS (kernel), Debian (kernel, linux-4.9, postgresql-9.4, and ruby-zip), Fedora (cgit, firefox, knot-resolver, mingw-LibRaw, php-symfony, php-symfony3, php-symfony4, php-zendframework-zend-diactoros, php-zendframework-zend-feed, php-zendframework-zend-http, python2-django1.11, quazip, sox, and thunderbird-enigmail), openSUSE (python-Django and seamonkey), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (kernel, kernel-rt, and redhat-virtualization-host), Scientific Linux (kernel), Slackware (openssl), SUSE (clamav, firefox, kernel, and samba), and Ubuntu (kernel, libxml2, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux-raspi2, linux-snapdragon, linux-hwe, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-lts-trusty, linux-lts-xenial, linux-aws, linux-raspi2, and samba).]]> Linux World News <![CDATA[farhaan: File Indexing In Golang]]> https://farhaanbukhsh.wordpress.com/2018/08/15/file-indexing-in-golang/ https://farhaanbukhsh.wordpress.com/2018/08/15/file-indexing-in-golang/ Wed, 15 Aug 2018 14:49:37 +0000

I have been working on a pet project to write a File Indexer, which is a utility that helps me to search a directory for a given word or phrase.

The motivation behind to build this utility was so that we could search the chat log files for dgplug. We have a lot of online classes and guest session and at time we just remember the name or a phrase used in the class, backtracking the files using these are not possible as of now. I thought I will give stab at this problem and since I am trying to learn golang I implemented my solution in it. I implemented this solution over a span of two weeks where I spent time to upskill on certain aspects and also to come up with a clean solution.

Exploration

This started with exploring a similar solution because why not? It is always better to improve an existing solution than to write your own. I didn’t find any which suits our need so I ended up writing my own. The exploration to find a solution led me to discover few of the libraries that can be useful to us. I discovered fulltext and Bleve.

I found bleve to have better documentation and really beautiful thought behind it. They have a very minimal yet effective thought process with which they designed the library. At the end of it I was sure I am going to use it and there is no going back.

Working On the Solution

After all the exploration I tried to break the problem I have into smaller problems and then to follow and solve each one of them. So first one was to understand how bleve works, I found out that bleve creates an index first for which we need to give it the list of files. The way the index is formed is basically a map structure behind the back where you give the id and content to be indexed. So what could be a unique constraint for a file in a filesystem? The path of the file I used it as the id to my structure and the content of my file as the value.

After figuring this out I wrote a function which takes the directory as the argument and gives back the path of each file and the content of each file. After few iteration of improvement it diverged into two functions one is responsible to get the path of all the files and the other just reads the file and get the content out.

func fileNameContentMap() []FileIndexer {
	var ROOTPATH = config.RootDirectory
	var files []string
	var filesIndex FileIndexer
	var fileIndexer []FileIndexer

	err := filepath.Walk(ROOTPATH, func(path string, info os.FileInfo, err error) error {
		if !info.IsDir() {
			files = append(files, path)
		}
		return nil
	})
	checkerr(err)
	for _, filename := range files {
		content := getContent(filename)
		filesIndex = FileIndexer{Filename: filename, FileContent: content}
		fileIndexer = append(fileIndexer, filesIndex)
	}
	return fileIndexer
}

This forms a struct which stores the name of the file and the content of the file. And since I can have many files I need to have a array of the struct. This is how the transition of moving from a simple data structure evolves into complex one.

Now I have the utility of getting all files, getting content of the file and making an index.

This forms a crucial step of what we are going to achieve next.

How Do I Search?

Now since I am able to do the part which prepares my data the next logical stem was to retrieve the searched results. The way we search something is by passing a query so I duck-typed a function which accepts a string and then went on a spree of documentation to find out how do I search in bleve, I found a simple implementation which returns me the id of the file which is the path and match score.

 func searchResults(indexFilename string, searchWord string) *bleve.SearchResult {
	index, _ := bleve.Open(indexFilename)
	defer index.Close()
	query := bleve.NewQueryStringQuery(searchWord)
	searchRequest := bleve.NewSearchRequest(query)
	searchResult, _ := index.Search(searchRequest)
	return searchResult
}

This function opens the index and search for the term and returns back the information.

Let’s Serve It

After all that is done I need to have a service which does this on demand so I wrote a simple API server which has two endpoints index and search.  The way mux works is you give the enpoint to the handler and which function has to be mapped with it. I had to restructure the code in order to make this work. I faced a very crazy bug which when I narrowed down came to a point of a memory leak and yes it was because I left the file read stream open so remember when you Open always defer Close.

I used Postman to heavily test it and it war returning me good responses. A dummy response looks like this:

 [{"index":"irclogs.bleve","id":"logs/some/hey.txt","score":0.6912244671221862,"sort":["_score"]}]

Missing Parts?

The missing part was I didn’t use any dependency manager which Kushal pointed out to me so I landed up using dep to do this for me. The next one was the best problem and that is how do auto-index a file, which suppose my service is running and I added one more file to the directory, this files content wouldn’t come up in the search because the indexer has not run on it. This was a beautiful problem I tried to approach it from many different angles first I thought I would re-run the service every time I add a file but that’s not a graceful solution then I thought I would write a cron which will ping /index at regular interval and yet again that was a bad option, finally I thought if I could detect the change in file. This led me to explore gin, modd and fresh.

Gin was not very compatible with mux so didn’t use it, modd was very nice but I need to kill the server to restart it since two service cannot run on a single port and every time I kill that service I kill the modd daemon too so that possibility also got ruled out.

Finally the best solution was fresh although I had to write a custom config file to suite the requirement this still has issues with nested repository indexing which I am thinking how to figure out.

What’s Next?

This project is yet to be containerised and there are missing test cases so I would be working on them as and when I get time.

I have learnt a lot of new things about filesystem and how it works because of this project, this helped me appreciate a lot of golang concepts and made me realise the power of static typing.

If you are interested you are welcome to contribute to file-indexer. Feel free to ping me.

Till then, Happy Hacking!

 

]]>

I have been working on a pet project to write a File Indexer, which is a utility that helps me to search a directory for a given word or phrase.

The motivation behind to build this utility was so that we could search the chat log files for dgplug. We have a lot of online classes and guest session and at time we just remember the name or a phrase used in the class, backtracking the files using these are not possible as of now. I thought I will give stab at this problem and since I am trying to learn golang I implemented my solution in it. I implemented this solution over a span of two weeks where I spent time to upskill on certain aspects and also to come up with a clean solution.

Exploration

This started with exploring a similar solution because why not? It is always better to improve an existing solution than to write your own. I didn’t find any which suits our need so I ended up writing my own. The exploration to find a solution led me to discover few of the libraries that can be useful to us. I discovered fulltext and Bleve.

I found bleve to have better documentation and really beautiful thought behind it. They have a very minimal yet effective thought process with which they designed the library. At the end of it I was sure I am going to use it and there is no going back.

Working On the Solution

After all the exploration I tried to break the problem I have into smaller problems and then to follow and solve each one of them. So first one was to understand how bleve works, I found out that bleve creates an index first for which we need to give it the list of files. The way the index is formed is basically a map structure behind the back where you give the id and content to be indexed. So what could be a unique constraint for a file in a filesystem? The path of the file I used it as the id to my structure and the content of my file as the value.

After figuring this out I wrote a function which takes the directory as the argument and gives back the path of each file and the content of each file. After few iteration of improvement it diverged into two functions one is responsible to get the path of all the files and the other just reads the file and get the content out.

func fileNameContentMap() []FileIndexer {
	var ROOTPATH = config.RootDirectory
	var files []string
	var filesIndex FileIndexer
	var fileIndexer []FileIndexer

	err := filepath.Walk(ROOTPATH, func(path string, info os.FileInfo, err error) error {
		if !info.IsDir() {
			files = append(files, path)
		}
		return nil
	})
	checkerr(err)
	for _, filename := range files {
		content := getContent(filename)
		filesIndex = FileIndexer{Filename: filename, FileContent: content}
		fileIndexer = append(fileIndexer, filesIndex)
	}
	return fileIndexer
}

This forms a struct which stores the name of the file and the content of the file. And since I can have many files I need to have a array of the struct. This is how the transition of moving from a simple data structure evolves into complex one.

Now I have the utility of getting all files, getting content of the file and making an index.

This forms a crucial step of what we are going to achieve next.

How Do I Search?

Now since I am able to do the part which prepares my data the next logical stem was to retrieve the searched results. The way we search something is by passing a query so I duck-typed a function which accepts a string and then went on a spree of documentation to find out how do I search in bleve, I found a simple implementation which returns me the id of the file which is the path and match score.

 func searchResults(indexFilename string, searchWord string) *bleve.SearchResult {
	index, _ := bleve.Open(indexFilename)
	defer index.Close()
	query := bleve.NewQueryStringQuery(searchWord)
	searchRequest := bleve.NewSearchRequest(query)
	searchResult, _ := index.Search(searchRequest)
	return searchResult
}

This function opens the index and search for the term and returns back the information.

Let’s Serve It

After all that is done I need to have a service which does this on demand so I wrote a simple API server which has two endpoints index and search.  The way mux works is you give the enpoint to the handler and which function has to be mapped with it. I had to restructure the code in order to make this work. I faced a very crazy bug which when I narrowed down came to a point of a memory leak and yes it was because I left the file read stream open so remember when you Open always defer Close.

I used Postman to heavily test it and it war returning me good responses. A dummy response looks like this:

 [{"index":"irclogs.bleve","id":"logs/some/hey.txt","score":0.6912244671221862,"sort":["_score"]}]

Missing Parts?

The missing part was I didn’t use any dependency manager which Kushal pointed out to me so I landed up using dep to do this for me. The next one was the best problem and that is how do auto-index a file, which suppose my service is running and I added one more file to the directory, this files content wouldn’t come up in the search because the indexer has not run on it. This was a beautiful problem I tried to approach it from many different angles first I thought I would re-run the service every time I add a file but that’s not a graceful solution then I thought I would write a cron which will ping /index at regular interval and yet again that was a bad option, finally I thought if I could detect the change in file. This led me to explore gin, modd and fresh.

Gin was not very compatible with mux so didn’t use it, modd was very nice but I need to kill the server to restart it since two service cannot run on a single port and every time I kill that service I kill the modd daemon too so that possibility also got ruled out.

Finally the best solution was fresh although I had to write a custom config file to suite the requirement this still has issues with nested repository indexing which I am thinking how to figure out.

What’s Next?

This project is yet to be containerised and there are missing test cases so I would be working on them as and when I get time.

I have learnt a lot of new things about filesystem and how it works because of this project, this helped me appreciate a lot of golang concepts and made me realise the power of static typing.

If you are interested you are welcome to contribute to file-indexer. Feel free to ping me.

Till then, Happy Hacking!

 

]]>
Fedora Planet
<![CDATA[Oscillating brain goes regular before migraine pain hits]]> https://arstechnica.com/?p=1357749 https://arstechnica.com/?p=1357749 Wed, 15 Aug 2018 14:31:47 +0000

Enlarge (credit: Lisa Brewster)

Migraines suck—understatement of the year right there. Migraines are also poorly understood, and it's kind of hard to come up with effective remedies if you don’t understand what you are treating.

One way to understand migraines is through physics. The brain is a network of neurons that are constantly talking to each other. This, in physics-speak, is a dynamical system. Dynamical systems can have more than one stable operating point. A horrible consequence of this particular system might be that migraines represent a stable operating point of the brain.

No going back

A recent paper—one that isn’t especially exciting—has forced me to write about oscillating brains. I’ve talked about chaotic systems, nonlinear dynamics, and dynamical systems before. I won’t repeat everything written previously, but I do want to emphasize the concept of transitions that don’t easily reverse. 

Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

]]>

Enlarge (credit: Lisa Brewster)

Migraines suck—understatement of the year right there. Migraines are also poorly understood, and it's kind of hard to come up with effective remedies if you don’t understand what you are treating.

One way to understand migraines is through physics. The brain is a network of neurons that are constantly talking to each other. This, in physics-speak, is a dynamical system. Dynamical systems can have more than one stable operating point. A horrible consequence of this particular system might be that migraines represent a stable operating point of the brain.

No going back

A recent paper—one that isn’t especially exciting—has forced me to write about oscillating brains. I’ve talked about chaotic systems, nonlinear dynamics, and dynamical systems before. I won’t repeat everything written previously, but I do want to emphasize the concept of transitions that don’t easily reverse. 

Read 15 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ars Technica News Feed
<![CDATA[EPIC board boasts 4x GbE ports and PCIe x4]]> http://linuxgizmos.com/epic-board-boasts-4x-gbe-ports-and-pcie-x4/ http://linuxgizmos.com/epic-board-boasts-4x-gbe-ports-and-pcie-x4/ Wed, 15 Aug 2018 14:20:21 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[10 Reasons to Attend ONS Europe in September | Registration Deadline Approaching – Register & Save $605]]> https://www.linux.com/news/10-reasons-attend-ons-europe-september-registration-deadline-approaching-register-save-605 https://www.linux.com/news/10-reasons-attend-ons-europe-september-registration-deadline-approaching-register-save-605 Wed, 15 Aug 2018 14:17:22 +0000

Here’s a sneak peek at why you need to be at Open Networking Summit Europe in Amsterdam next month! But hurry – spots are going quickly. Secure your spot and register by September 1 to save $605.

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Here’s a sneak peek at why you need to be at Open Networking Summit Europe in Amsterdam next month! But hurry – spots are going quickly. Secure your spot and register by September 1 to save $605.

]]>
Linux.com
<![CDATA[Twitter gives Alex Jones one-week time out for inciting violence]]> https://arstechnica.com/?p=1359151 https://arstechnica.com/?p=1359151 Wed, 15 Aug 2018 14:11:24 +0000

Enlarge / Alex Jones (credit: Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

After holding out for a few weeks, Twitter joined the chorus of social media and tech giants that have punished conspiracy theorist Alex Jones for questionable content. Twitter suspended Jones from his account on Tuesday after he tweeted out a link to a video in which he calls for his supporters to get their "battle rifles" ready for the media and others.

But the catch is that Jones' ban will last just seven days—the InfoWars host will not be able to tweet or retweet from his personal account during that week. The InfoWars Twitter account has not been affected by this suspension.

According to a report by The New York Times, Jones tweeted a link to a Periscope live broadcast video (which can be viewed in part in a Media Matters tweet) in which he urged his supporters to ready their weapons against the media and other groups. Twitter issued the seven-day suspension after a user flagged the tweet and the company determined that it violated its rules against inciting violence.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

]]>

Enlarge / Alex Jones (credit: Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

After holding out for a few weeks, Twitter joined the chorus of social media and tech giants that have punished conspiracy theorist Alex Jones for questionable content. Twitter suspended Jones from his account on Tuesday after he tweeted out a link to a video in which he calls for his supporters to get their "battle rifles" ready for the media and others.

But the catch is that Jones' ban will last just seven days—the InfoWars host will not be able to tweet or retweet from his personal account during that week. The InfoWars Twitter account has not been affected by this suspension.

According to a report by The New York Times, Jones tweeted a link to a Periscope live broadcast video (which can be viewed in part in a Media Matters tweet) in which he urged his supporters to ready their weapons against the media and other groups. Twitter issued the seven-day suspension after a user flagged the tweet and the company determined that it violated its rules against inciting violence.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Ars Technica News Feed
<![CDATA[Researchers Reveal Security Vulnerabilities in Tracking Apps]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/eSBqMkqdKlM/researchers-reveal-security-vulnerabilities-in-tracking-apps.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/eSBqMkqdKlM/researchers-reveal-security-vulnerabilities-in-tracking-apps.html Wed, 15 Aug 2018 14:00:00 +0000 eWEEK: At Defcon, security researchers revealed 37 new vulnerabilities in tracking apps that could have enabled attackers to steal information and track users.

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eWEEK: At Defcon, security researchers revealed 37 new vulnerabilities in tracking apps that could have enabled attackers to steal information and track users.

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Linux Today
<![CDATA[Why Isn’t Blockchain Technology Adoption Soaring?]]> https://www.itprotoday.com/open-source/why-isnt-blockchain-technology-adoption-soaring https://www.itprotoday.com/open-source/why-isnt-blockchain-technology-adoption-soaring Wed, 15 Aug 2018 13:50:15 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[New Intel Chip Exploits Discovered, Instagram Accounts Attacked, Nativ Vita Hi-Res Music Server Has New Features, QEMU 3.0 Now Available and the Debian GNU/Linux Project Turns 25 Tomorrow]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxjournalcom/~3/8nwlgeEtw-k/new-intel-chip-exploits-discovered-instagram-accounts-attacked-nativ-vita-hi-res-music http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxjournalcom/~3/8nwlgeEtw-k/new-intel-chip-exploits-discovered-instagram-accounts-attacked-nativ-vita-hi-res-music Wed, 15 Aug 2018 13:37:44 +0000

News briefs for August 15, 2018.

Three new Meltdown/Spectre-type Intel chip exploits have been discovered that affect Intel's desktop, workstation and server CPUs, and they are especially problematic for containers. ItProToday reports that "The latest exploits might prove to be particularly troublesome for those using containers since each container runs on its own implementation of Linux, which likely means each and every container will need to be patched. According to Red Hat, 'every Linux and Kubernetes distribution is impacted. All organizations deploying containers should consult their Linux/Kubernetes/containers provider.'" See also the Red Hat blog for more information.

Instagram accounts are being attacked—even those using 2FA. Mashable reports that users are being locked out of their accounts, their profile avatars are being changed and bios deleted. Restoring account access is evidently quite difficult.

The open platform Nativ Vita Hi-Res Music Server has been updated, adding serious new functionality, such as multi-room streaming, support of up to 10TB, playing music from a NAS or computer and CD ripping.

QEMU 3.0 is now available. Phoronix reports that this big feature release brings new functionality and several improvements including "Spectre V4 mitigation for x86 Intel/AMD, improved support for nested KVM guests on Microsoft Hyper-V, block device support for active mirroring, improved support for AHCI and SCSI emulation, OpenGL ES support within the SDL front-end, improved latency for user-mode networking, various ARM improvements, some POWER9 / RISC-V / s390 improvements too, and various other new bits." See the QEMU ChangeLog for details.

The Debian GNU/Linux project turns 25 tomorrow. Source: ITWire.

]]>

News briefs for August 15, 2018.

Three new Meltdown/Spectre-type Intel chip exploits have been discovered that affect Intel's desktop, workstation and server CPUs, and they are especially problematic for containers. ItProToday reports that "The latest exploits might prove to be particularly troublesome for those using containers since each container runs on its own implementation of Linux, which likely means each and every container will need to be patched. According to Red Hat, 'every Linux and Kubernetes distribution is impacted. All organizations deploying containers should consult their Linux/Kubernetes/containers provider.'" See also the Red Hat blog for more information.

Instagram accounts are being attacked—even those using 2FA. Mashable reports that users are being locked out of their accounts, their profile avatars are being changed and bios deleted. Restoring account access is evidently quite difficult.

The open platform Nativ Vita Hi-Res Music Server has been updated, adding serious new functionality, such as multi-room streaming, support of up to 10TB, playing music from a NAS or computer and CD ripping.

QEMU 3.0 is now available. Phoronix reports that this big feature release brings new functionality and several improvements including "Spectre V4 mitigation for x86 Intel/AMD, improved support for nested KVM guests on Microsoft Hyper-V, block device support for active mirroring, improved support for AHCI and SCSI emulation, OpenGL ES support within the SDL front-end, improved latency for user-mode networking, various ARM improvements, some POWER9 / RISC-V / s390 improvements too, and various other new bits." See the QEMU ChangeLog for details.

The Debian GNU/Linux project turns 25 tomorrow. Source: ITWire.

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Linux Journal