FOSS Force News Wire http://fossforce.com <![CDATA[Red Hat changes its open-source licensing rules]]> https://www.zdnet.com/article/red-hat-changes-its-open-source-licensing-rules/ https://www.zdnet.com/article/red-hat-changes-its-open-source-licensing-rules/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 04:20:35 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[Articles About a Unitary Patent System Are Lies and Marketing From Law Firms With ‘Lawsuits Lust’]]> http://techrights.org/2018/06/19/upc-lying-resumes/ http://techrights.org/2018/06/19/upc-lying-resumes/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 04:15:49 +0000 Lying has become a norm

A small EPO

Summary: Team UPC has grown louder with its lobbying efforts this past week; the same lies are being repeated without much of a challenge and press ownership plays a role in that

EARLIER this week we warned about two lies about UPC — lies that we see perpetuated almost daily by Team UPC and sometimes the EPO as well. Amid expectations of layoffs the Office is looking for a replacement.

The UPC won’t start in a matter of months; this is a blatant lie from corrupt Battistelli and Team UPC, which has a lot of money at stake. They need this lie repeated ad infinitum in order to make sales (telling customers to pursue their ‘unitary’ offerings). As for Battistelli, if all his abuses were in vain (resulting in 8 years of immeasurable damage, corruption and unprecedented abuses), how would he be remembered?

“The UPC won’t start in a matter of months; this is a blatant lie from corrupt Battistelli and Team UPC, which has a lot of money at stake.”We’d like to draw attention to the latest lies and respond to these very quick. Well, marked as “(press release) (blog)” in Google News yesterday was this utter garbage titled “Patent Translation in Europe: How to Deal with IP Protection” (they mean patents, not “IP”). Rae Steinbach is trying to tell the German Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) what to do. And what for? To basically harm the whole of Europe for the interests of some patent law firms (like his). Great example of the arrogance and greed of Team UPC? Still willing to lie and break laws, constitutions etc. to make a buck/euro?

from the ‘article’ (flagged by Google as “press release” and “blog”):

The European Unitary Patent package also aims to address these complications and make the system easier for businesses and individuals to navigate. As a result, the organization is looking to reduce the costs associated with patent and other IP related applications.

It is expected that the Unitary Patent package will come into effect in 2019…

[...]

As the largest EU economy, it is essential that Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court decides in favour of ratifying the Unitary Patent System. Doing so will make it an attractive alternative to individual EU state’s patents for persons and businesses wishing to obtain legal protection for intellectual property, inventions, and innovations across Europe.

Notice the above claims; these fit perfectly the pattern of lies we’ve been speaking about. They write these lies and then pay sites to carry these lies (so that Google News perpetuates their lies). And they don’t just embed themselves in the media as sometimes they literally own it. Here’s an example from yesterday, stating upfront, in Out-Law.com, that “Dublin-based Ann Henry of Pinsent Masons, the law firm behind Out-Law.com,” is lobbying for the UPC using the media — its very own media — spreading lies in its financial interests again. Here are the relevant passages, pressing the Irish authorities to embrace something there was no referendum on in Ireland (this was indefinitely delayed):

Dublin-based Ann Henry of Pinsent Masons, the law firm behind Out-Law.com, said a new report published by the Irish government highlighted the range of concerns pharma-chemical businesses in Ireland have about the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.

[...]

“Clients in the sector are particularly concerned about divergence in technical specifications and products standards making product authorisation potentially more costly and protracted,” Henry said. “In addition, Brexit throws up a raft of intellectual property law related issues such as customs watch notices and the future of the unitary patent and the Unified Patent Court. These are all concerns for the sector, as is the logistics and supply chain disruption Brexit creates for pharmaceutical and chemical businesses in circumstances where the UK has been effectively Ireland’s ‘bridge’ to continental Europe.”

So under the guise of “news” what we have here is a law firm pushing its own interests, demonstrating issues of media control.

“Marks & Clerk has been one of the loudest UPC lobbyists out there, outdone only by Bristows, at least in the UK.”Another new example from yesterday (albeit unrelated to the UPC) came from Physics World, which acts as a megaphone for lawyers rather than actual physicists. Latest example of patent marketing disguised as advice? We wrote about this phenomenon only a few days ago and we’ve gotten some feedback since, e.g. from people who said they had experienced the same thing (lawyers looking to exploit them like that). From the so-called ‘article’ (summary): “Every company wants to attract investors and deter competitors. Patent attorney David Robinson explains how a good intellectual property strategy has helped biomedical physics firm Bioxydyn do just that” (the bottom says “David Robinson is a partner and patent attorney at Marks & Clerk in Manchester, UK”).

What we have here are proponents of software patents and UPC not far from where I live. Marks & Clerk has been one of the loudest UPC lobbyists out there, outdone only by Bristows, at least in the UK.

Hours ago we saw “Karl Barnfather chairman of IP firm Withers & Rogers” pretending that patents and innovation are the same thing. He just cited EPO data:

New figures suggest innovation in the UK has increased, but we are lagging behind other parts of Europe and Brexit could yet turn the clock back writes Karl Barnfather chairman of IP firm Withers & Rogers

A site called The Engineer is now being composed by patent lawyers. Great!

“How many articles have been written over the past 3 years saying that the UPC was about to start? They were all wrong.”And if that’s not bad enough, across the Atlantic we have Watchtroll advertising software patents of SafeBreach under the guise of “investment” news. This vaguely-titled spam/ad in ‘article’ form (for DLA Piper) is also noteworthy.

The media, at least as far as patent matters are concerned, is a joke. It’s mostly marketing if not spam from law firms. A lot of it is also lobbying disguised as news. We have been writing about this problem for many years. Bemoaning it may not accomplish much, but at least we hope that readers are made aware. How many articles have been written over the past 3 years saying that the UPC was about to start? They were all wrong.

]]>
Lying has become a norm

A small EPO

Summary: Team UPC has grown louder with its lobbying efforts this past week; the same lies are being repeated without much of a challenge and press ownership plays a role in that

EARLIER this week we warned about two lies about UPC — lies that we see perpetuated almost daily by Team UPC and sometimes the EPO as well. Amid expectations of layoffs the Office is looking for a replacement.

The UPC won’t start in a matter of months; this is a blatant lie from corrupt Battistelli and Team UPC, which has a lot of money at stake. They need this lie repeated ad infinitum in order to make sales (telling customers to pursue their ‘unitary’ offerings). As for Battistelli, if all his abuses were in vain (resulting in 8 years of immeasurable damage, corruption and unprecedented abuses), how would he be remembered?

“The UPC won’t start in a matter of months; this is a blatant lie from corrupt Battistelli and Team UPC, which has a lot of money at stake.”We’d like to draw attention to the latest lies and respond to these very quick. Well, marked as “(press release) (blog)” in Google News yesterday was this utter garbage titled “Patent Translation in Europe: How to Deal with IP Protection” (they mean patents, not “IP”). Rae Steinbach is trying to tell the German Federal Constitutional Court (FCC) what to do. And what for? To basically harm the whole of Europe for the interests of some patent law firms (like his). Great example of the arrogance and greed of Team UPC? Still willing to lie and break laws, constitutions etc. to make a buck/euro?

from the ‘article’ (flagged by Google as “press release” and “blog”):

The European Unitary Patent package also aims to address these complications and make the system easier for businesses and individuals to navigate. As a result, the organization is looking to reduce the costs associated with patent and other IP related applications.

It is expected that the Unitary Patent package will come into effect in 2019…

[...]

As the largest EU economy, it is essential that Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court decides in favour of ratifying the Unitary Patent System. Doing so will make it an attractive alternative to individual EU state’s patents for persons and businesses wishing to obtain legal protection for intellectual property, inventions, and innovations across Europe.

Notice the above claims; these fit perfectly the pattern of lies we’ve been speaking about. They write these lies and then pay sites to carry these lies (so that Google News perpetuates their lies). And they don’t just embed themselves in the media as sometimes they literally own it. Here’s an example from yesterday, stating upfront, in Out-Law.com, that “Dublin-based Ann Henry of Pinsent Masons, the law firm behind Out-Law.com,” is lobbying for the UPC using the media — its very own media — spreading lies in its financial interests again. Here are the relevant passages, pressing the Irish authorities to embrace something there was no referendum on in Ireland (this was indefinitely delayed):

Dublin-based Ann Henry of Pinsent Masons, the law firm behind Out-Law.com, said a new report published by the Irish government highlighted the range of concerns pharma-chemical businesses in Ireland have about the UK’s withdrawal from the EU.

[...]

“Clients in the sector are particularly concerned about divergence in technical specifications and products standards making product authorisation potentially more costly and protracted,” Henry said. “In addition, Brexit throws up a raft of intellectual property law related issues such as customs watch notices and the future of the unitary patent and the Unified Patent Court. These are all concerns for the sector, as is the logistics and supply chain disruption Brexit creates for pharmaceutical and chemical businesses in circumstances where the UK has been effectively Ireland’s ‘bridge’ to continental Europe.”

So under the guise of “news” what we have here is a law firm pushing its own interests, demonstrating issues of media control.

“Marks & Clerk has been one of the loudest UPC lobbyists out there, outdone only by Bristows, at least in the UK.”Another new example from yesterday (albeit unrelated to the UPC) came from Physics World, which acts as a megaphone for lawyers rather than actual physicists. Latest example of patent marketing disguised as advice? We wrote about this phenomenon only a few days ago and we’ve gotten some feedback since, e.g. from people who said they had experienced the same thing (lawyers looking to exploit them like that). From the so-called ‘article’ (summary): “Every company wants to attract investors and deter competitors. Patent attorney David Robinson explains how a good intellectual property strategy has helped biomedical physics firm Bioxydyn do just that” (the bottom says “David Robinson is a partner and patent attorney at Marks & Clerk in Manchester, UK”).

What we have here are proponents of software patents and UPC not far from where I live. Marks & Clerk has been one of the loudest UPC lobbyists out there, outdone only by Bristows, at least in the UK.

Hours ago we saw “Karl Barnfather chairman of IP firm Withers & Rogers” pretending that patents and innovation are the same thing. He just cited EPO data:

New figures suggest innovation in the UK has increased, but we are lagging behind other parts of Europe and Brexit could yet turn the clock back writes Karl Barnfather chairman of IP firm Withers & Rogers

A site called The Engineer is now being composed by patent lawyers. Great!

“How many articles have been written over the past 3 years saying that the UPC was about to start? They were all wrong.”And if that’s not bad enough, across the Atlantic we have Watchtroll advertising software patents of SafeBreach under the guise of “investment” news. This vaguely-titled spam/ad in ‘article’ form (for DLA Piper) is also noteworthy.

The media, at least as far as patent matters are concerned, is a joke. It’s mostly marketing if not spam from law firms. A lot of it is also lobbying disguised as news. We have been writing about this problem for many years. Bemoaning it may not accomplish much, but at least we hope that readers are made aware. How many articles have been written over the past 3 years saying that the UPC was about to start? They were all wrong.

]]>
Techrights
<![CDATA[Open source board lets you analyze SPI connections on a USB-connected laptop]]> http://linuxgizmos.com/open-source-board-lets-you-analyze-spi-connections-on-a-usb-connected-laptop/ http://linuxgizmos.com/open-source-board-lets-you-analyze-spi-connections-on-a-usb-connected-laptop/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 03:50:07 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[Matthias Clasen: Flatpak in detail, part 2]]> https://blogs.gnome.org/mclasen/2018/06/19/flatpak-in-detail-part-2/ https://blogs.gnome.org/mclasen/2018/06/19/flatpak-in-detail-part-2/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 03:44:57 +0000

The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.

Installations and repositories

An installation is a place on your filesystem where flatpak can install apps and runtimes. By default, flatpak has a system-wide installation in /var/lib/flatpak, and a user installation in $HOME/.local/share/flatpak.

It is possible to define additional system-wide installations by placing a key file in /etc/flatpak/installations.d. For example, this can be used to keep apps on a portable drive.

Part of the data that flatpak keeps for each installation is a list of remotes. A remote is a reference to an ostree repository that is available somewhere on the network.

Each installation also has its own local ostree repository (for example, the system-wide installation has its repo in /var/lib/flatpak/repo). You can explore the contents of these repositories using the ostree utility;

$ ostree --repo=$HOME/.local/share/flatpak/repo/ refs
gnome-nightly:appstream/x86_64
flathub:runtime/org.freedesktop.Platform.Locale/x86_64/1.6
flathub:app/de.wolfvollprecht.UberWriter/x86_64/stable
...

Branches and versions

Similar to git, ostree organizes the data in a repository in commits, which are grouped in branches. Commits are identified by a hash and branches are identified by a name.

While ostree does not care about the format of a branch name, flatpak uses branch names of the form $KIND/$ID/$ARCH/$BRANCH to uniquely identify branches.

Here are some examples:

app/org.inkscape.Inkscape/x86_64/stable
runtime/org.gnome.Platform/x86_64/master

Most of the  time, it is clear from the context if an app or runtime is being named, and only one architecture is relevant. For this case, flatpak allows a shorthand notation for branch names omitting the $KIND and $ARCH parts: $ID//$BRANCH.

In this notation, the above examples shrink to:

org.inkscape.Inkscape//stable
org.gnome.Platform//master

Deployments

Installing an app or runtime really consists of two steps: first, flatpak caches that data in the local repo of the installation, and then it deploys it, which means it creates a check-out of the branch from the local repo. The check-outs are organized in a folder structure that reflects the branch name organization.

For example, Inkscape will be checked-out in $HOME/.local/share/flatpak/app/org.inkscape.Inkscape/x86_64/stable/$COMMIT, where $COMMIT is the hash of the commit that is being deployed.

It is possible to have multiple commits from the same branch deployed, but one of them is considered active and will be used by default. Flatpak maintains symlink in the check-out directory that points at the active commit.

It is also possible to have multiple branches of an app or runtime deployed at the same time; the directory structure of checkouts is designed to allow that. One of the branches is considered current. Flatpak maintains a symlink at the toplevel of the checkout that points at the current checkout.

Flatpak can run an app from any deployed commit, regardless whether it is active or current or not. To run a particular commit, you can use the –commit option of flatpak run.

The relevance of being active and current is that flatpak exports some data (in particular, desktop files) from the active commit of the current branch, by symlinking it into ~/.local/share/flatpak/exports,  where for example gnome-shell will find it and allow you to run the app from the overview.

Note: Even though it is perfectly ok to have multiple versions of the same app installed, running more than one at the same time will typically not work, since the different versions will claim the app ID as their unique bus name on the session bus. A way around this limitation is to explicitly give one of the versions a different ID, for example, by appending a “.nightly” suffix.

Application data

One last aspect of filesystem organization to mention here is that every app that is run with flatpak gets a some filesystem space to use for permanent storage. This space is in $HOME/.var/app/$ID, and it has subdirectories called cache, config and data. At runtime, flatpak sets the XDG_CACHE_DIR, XDG_CONFIG_HOME and XDG_DATA_HOME environment variables to point at these directores.

For example, the persistent data from the inkscape flatpak can be found in $HOME/.var/app/org.inkscape.Inkscape.

Summary

Flatpak installations may look a bit intimidating with their deep diretory tree, but they have a well-defined structure and this post hopefully helps to explain the various components.

]]>

The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.

Installations and repositories

An installation is a place on your filesystem where flatpak can install apps and runtimes. By default, flatpak has a system-wide installation in /var/lib/flatpak, and a user installation in $HOME/.local/share/flatpak.

It is possible to define additional system-wide installations by placing a key file in /etc/flatpak/installations.d. For example, this can be used to keep apps on a portable drive.

Part of the data that flatpak keeps for each installation is a list of remotes. A remote is a reference to an ostree repository that is available somewhere on the network.

Each installation also has its own local ostree repository (for example, the system-wide installation has its repo in /var/lib/flatpak/repo). You can explore the contents of these repositories using the ostree utility;

$ ostree --repo=$HOME/.local/share/flatpak/repo/ refs
gnome-nightly:appstream/x86_64
flathub:runtime/org.freedesktop.Platform.Locale/x86_64/1.6
flathub:app/de.wolfvollprecht.UberWriter/x86_64/stable
...

Branches and versions

Similar to git, ostree organizes the data in a repository in commits, which are grouped in branches. Commits are identified by a hash and branches are identified by a name.

While ostree does not care about the format of a branch name, flatpak uses branch names of the form $KIND/$ID/$ARCH/$BRANCH to uniquely identify branches.

Here are some examples:

app/org.inkscape.Inkscape/x86_64/stable
runtime/org.gnome.Platform/x86_64/master

Most of the  time, it is clear from the context if an app or runtime is being named, and only one architecture is relevant. For this case, flatpak allows a shorthand notation for branch names omitting the $KIND and $ARCH parts: $ID//$BRANCH.

In this notation, the above examples shrink to:

org.inkscape.Inkscape//stable
org.gnome.Platform//master

Deployments

Installing an app or runtime really consists of two steps: first, flatpak caches that data in the local repo of the installation, and then it deploys it, which means it creates a check-out of the branch from the local repo. The check-outs are organized in a folder structure that reflects the branch name organization.

For example, Inkscape will be checked-out in $HOME/.local/share/flatpak/app/org.inkscape.Inkscape/x86_64/stable/$COMMIT, where $COMMIT is the hash of the commit that is being deployed.

It is possible to have multiple commits from the same branch deployed, but one of them is considered active and will be used by default. Flatpak maintains symlink in the check-out directory that points at the active commit.

It is also possible to have multiple branches of an app or runtime deployed at the same time; the directory structure of checkouts is designed to allow that. One of the branches is considered current. Flatpak maintains a symlink at the toplevel of the checkout that points at the current checkout.

Flatpak can run an app from any deployed commit, regardless whether it is active or current or not. To run a particular commit, you can use the –commit option of flatpak run.

The relevance of being active and current is that flatpak exports some data (in particular, desktop files) from the active commit of the current branch, by symlinking it into ~/.local/share/flatpak/exports,  where for example gnome-shell will find it and allow you to run the app from the overview.

Note: Even though it is perfectly ok to have multiple versions of the same app installed, running more than one at the same time will typically not work, since the different versions will claim the app ID as their unique bus name on the session bus. A way around this limitation is to explicitly give one of the versions a different ID, for example, by appending a “.nightly” suffix.

Application data

One last aspect of filesystem organization to mention here is that every app that is run with flatpak gets a some filesystem space to use for permanent storage. This space is in $HOME/.var/app/$ID, and it has subdirectories called cache, config and data. At runtime, flatpak sets the XDG_CACHE_DIR, XDG_CONFIG_HOME and XDG_DATA_HOME environment variables to point at these directores.

For example, the persistent data from the inkscape flatpak can be found in $HOME/.var/app/org.inkscape.Inkscape.

Summary

Flatpak installations may look a bit intimidating with their deep diretory tree, but they have a well-defined structure and this post hopefully helps to explain the various components.

]]>
Fedora Planet
<![CDATA[The Decline in Patent Quality at the EPO Causes Frivolous Lawsuits That Only Lawyers Profit From]]> http://techrights.org/2018/06/19/antonio-campinos-patent-quality/ http://techrights.org/2018/06/19/antonio-campinos-patent-quality/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 03:32:50 +0000 But only as long as their clients still believe that European Patents have predictability associated with them

Spare money

Summary: The European Patent Office (EPO) will continue granting low-quality European Patents under the leadership of the Battistelli-’nominated’ Frenchman, António Campinos; this is bad news for science and technology as that quite likely means a lot more lawsuits without merit (which only lawyers profit from)

THE USPTO — unlike the EPO — is actually trying to improve patent quality (it has to, seeing what the courts have been doing). We will write about that separately later today.

“All the key managers will remain in place; it will be Team Battistelli, led by a Battistelli-picked President.”Based on what we have been hearing (sources close to the EPO), António Campinos will be another Battistelli but a much younger Battistelli. All the key managers will remain in place; it will be Team Battistelli, led by a Battistelli-picked President.

Now, we totally understand that EPO staff is hoping for a surprise, but optimism can sometimes lead to disappointments. Dugie Standeford from IP Watch has just published “EPO Staff, Users List Priorities For Incoming President” — an article behind a paywall that starts as follows:

As the European Patent Office (EPO) prepares to welcome a new president, staff members and patent practitioners are setting out their priorities and suggestions for the newcomer, António Campinos. Topping the list for patent examiners is ending the contentious relationship between management and employees. Patent attorneys and litigators, meanwhile, want to see more attention paid to creating a fair balance between the speed of patent grants and patent quality.

They would be wrong to assume that Campinos may pursue a turnaround. As far as he’s concerned, Battistelli has done nothing wrong and patent quality is fine (Dr. Erst, his upcoming boss, says the same thing). But patent quality is not fine; examiners say so and so do stakeholders, who are definitely noticing.

Yesterday (last night in fact) we caught this new press release that says:

IntelGenx Corp. (TSX-V:IGX) (OTCQX:IGXT) (the “Company” or “IntelGenx”) today announced that the European Patent Office (“EPO”) has issued a “Notice of Intention to Grant” for the Company’s European Patent Application Number 14832172.2 entitled, “Instantly Wettable Oral Film Dosage Form Without Surfactant or Polyalcohol.” This is the first key patent allowed in Europe for the Company’s VersaFilm™ technology.

We don’t know much about the “oral” patent in question, but many questionable patents have been granted lately, including one on chewing gum (examiners amused themselves over this one) and also yesterday there was another press release. This one was about invalidated European Patents. Yes, again. But it took a big court battle to show it. The lawsuit was thus frivolous. Only parasitic law firms in Germany ‘won’ the case. To quote:

It should be noted that on March 29, 2018, the European patent Office (EPO) had already issued a preliminary non-binding opinion that the patent asserted in the name of Antoine Turzi and licensed to Regen Lab SA, EP 2073862 B1, is invalid. In its preliminary opinion, the opposition division of the EPO found the Turzi and Regenlab patent to be invalid on the grounds of (i) added matter, (ii) lack of novelty, and (iii) lack of sufficient disclosure. With respect to the prior disclosure issue, the Opposition Division of the EPO found that “it is shown beyond any reasonable doubt that the product was available prior to priority, a prior use had taken place and the features of the product could be investigated.”

Unless the Opposition Division of the EPO changes its views at an oral hearing, the result will be the complete invalidation and revocation of the Turzi PRP patent in all contracting states of the European Patent Convention.

How many more lawsuits of these kinds are in the ‘pipeline’ and how much worse would they be if there ever was a Unitary Patent System? We’ll say more about Unitary Patent in our next post.

]]>
But only as long as their clients still believe that European Patents have predictability associated with them

Spare money

Summary: The European Patent Office (EPO) will continue granting low-quality European Patents under the leadership of the Battistelli-’nominated’ Frenchman, António Campinos; this is bad news for science and technology as that quite likely means a lot more lawsuits without merit (which only lawyers profit from)

THE USPTO — unlike the EPO — is actually trying to improve patent quality (it has to, seeing what the courts have been doing). We will write about that separately later today.

“All the key managers will remain in place; it will be Team Battistelli, led by a Battistelli-picked President.”Based on what we have been hearing (sources close to the EPO), António Campinos will be another Battistelli but a much younger Battistelli. All the key managers will remain in place; it will be Team Battistelli, led by a Battistelli-picked President.

Now, we totally understand that EPO staff is hoping for a surprise, but optimism can sometimes lead to disappointments. Dugie Standeford from IP Watch has just published “EPO Staff, Users List Priorities For Incoming President” — an article behind a paywall that starts as follows:

As the European Patent Office (EPO) prepares to welcome a new president, staff members and patent practitioners are setting out their priorities and suggestions for the newcomer, António Campinos. Topping the list for patent examiners is ending the contentious relationship between management and employees. Patent attorneys and litigators, meanwhile, want to see more attention paid to creating a fair balance between the speed of patent grants and patent quality.

They would be wrong to assume that Campinos may pursue a turnaround. As far as he’s concerned, Battistelli has done nothing wrong and patent quality is fine (Dr. Erst, his upcoming boss, says the same thing). But patent quality is not fine; examiners say so and so do stakeholders, who are definitely noticing.

Yesterday (last night in fact) we caught this new press release that says:

IntelGenx Corp. (TSX-V:IGX) (OTCQX:IGXT) (the “Company” or “IntelGenx”) today announced that the European Patent Office (“EPO”) has issued a “Notice of Intention to Grant” for the Company’s European Patent Application Number 14832172.2 entitled, “Instantly Wettable Oral Film Dosage Form Without Surfactant or Polyalcohol.” This is the first key patent allowed in Europe for the Company’s VersaFilm™ technology.

We don’t know much about the “oral” patent in question, but many questionable patents have been granted lately, including one on chewing gum (examiners amused themselves over this one) and also yesterday there was another press release. This one was about invalidated European Patents. Yes, again. But it took a big court battle to show it. The lawsuit was thus frivolous. Only parasitic law firms in Germany ‘won’ the case. To quote:

It should be noted that on March 29, 2018, the European patent Office (EPO) had already issued a preliminary non-binding opinion that the patent asserted in the name of Antoine Turzi and licensed to Regen Lab SA, EP 2073862 B1, is invalid. In its preliminary opinion, the opposition division of the EPO found the Turzi and Regenlab patent to be invalid on the grounds of (i) added matter, (ii) lack of novelty, and (iii) lack of sufficient disclosure. With respect to the prior disclosure issue, the Opposition Division of the EPO found that “it is shown beyond any reasonable doubt that the product was available prior to priority, a prior use had taken place and the features of the product could be investigated.”

Unless the Opposition Division of the EPO changes its views at an oral hearing, the result will be the complete invalidation and revocation of the Turzi PRP patent in all contracting states of the European Patent Convention.

How many more lawsuits of these kinds are in the ‘pipeline’ and how much worse would they be if there ever was a Unitary Patent System? We’ll say more about Unitary Patent in our next post.

]]>
Techrights
<![CDATA[What Battistelli’s Workers Think of His Latest EPO Propaganda]]> http://techrights.org/2018/06/19/human-rights-abuses-are-modernising/ http://techrights.org/2018/06/19/human-rights-abuses-are-modernising/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 02:44:45 +0000 Modernising the EPO

Summary: “Modernising the EPO” is what Battistelli calls a plethora of human rights abuses and corruption

]]>
Modernising the EPO

Summary: “Modernising the EPO” is what Battistelli calls a plethora of human rights abuses and corruption

]]>
Techrights
<![CDATA[More Taco Tuesday Trademark Stupidity, This Time Down Under]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/techdirt/feed/~3/Asekt9VzBr4/more-taco-tuesday-trademark-stupidity-this-time-down-under.shtml http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/techdirt/feed/~3/Asekt9VzBr4/more-taco-tuesday-trademark-stupidity-this-time-down-under.shtml Wed, 20 Jun 2018 02:33:54 +0000 Some of us believe that all the different nations of the world are filled with people that are mostly the same, that share the same values, and the same troubles. If only we could find some unifying issue or force that could fully bring us together, then we could finally live in a kind of Lennon-esque harmony with one another. I submit to you that perhaps stupid trademark stories revolving around "Taco Tuesdays" could well be that thing. In America, for instance, a chain called Taco John's has spent the past few years waving around the trademark the USPTO stupidly gave it on the both generic and descriptive term "Taco Tuesdays", insisting that every other business that uses it stop immediately. How this mark was ever granted, given that it describes a good offered on the day it is offered -- tacos on a tuesday -- is a question that has kept me up many a night. Despite the trouble Taco John's has caused with this, the trademark remains registered and in place.

And now it appears that Australia has its own version of this, featuring another company waving around another trademark for "Taco Tuesdays" that never should have been granted.

A stone’s throw into the city’s wild west sits Footscray’s Reverence Hotel, famed for its live music and cheap Tuesday tacos. After six years of dishing up the spicy fare, the landmark corner hotel is suddenly feeling the heat over a claim that it is infringing a trademark held by Mexican food chain Salsas Fresh Mex, which has outlets dotted across Melbourne including a site at Highpoint shopping centre. A letter from Salsas Holdings marketing manager Rebecca Woods to The Reverence Hotel demanded it stop using the phrase ”Taco Tuesday” on its website and social media accounts.

“We assume that you are unaware that Salsas is the owner of the registered trade mark TACO TUESDAY in respect to the provision of Mexican-style food and restaurant services,” it states. “The Mexican-style food offered by Salsas under that trademark has become extremely well and favourably known among members of the public in Australia, and as a result is associated with Salsas.”

I'm going to keep hammering on this until someone listens, because this trademark is not valid. Period. Paragraph. Full stop. It does not identify a source. The phrase itself is generic and common in both the restaurant industry the world over and even in homes around the world. Tuesday is for tacos and nothing about the phrase has anything to do with any individual person or business.

The folks at Footscray's had this same reaction in the most punk venue way possible.

Publican Matt Bodiam said his first reaction on opening the letter on Wednesday was amusement, but he soon realised the potential seriousness.

“I had a bit of a giggle, then [thought] I better look into it,” he said. “I can’t believe someone can trademark ‘Taco Tuesday’; it would be like trademarking ‘Happy Hour’ or ‘Tight-Arse Tuesday’, although perhaps someone has trademarked those as well.”

Actually, the "happy hour" reference is only half right. In that phrase, we have an example of the generic language tons of businesses use. Taco Tuesdays is the same in that respect, except it's also descriptive. This isn't the protection of the consuming public, the very point of trademark law, but rather the locking up of language for commercial purposes. And it's dumb.

But it also works. Salsas has enough of a legal warchest to make Footscray's fighting the good fight on this an absurd notion. It is far easier and less expensive to simply cow to the demands of the trademark bully than putting up a fight in court. Trademark bullying, in other words, works. But perhaps not without giving creative punk venue owners the last laugh.

Mr Bodiam said The Reverence would continue selling tacos on Tuesdays, but the night is now listed on its site as “Taco Sueday”.

Bravo, sir.



Permalink | Comments | Email This Story
]]>
Some of us believe that all the different nations of the world are filled with people that are mostly the same, that share the same values, and the same troubles. If only we could find some unifying issue or force that could fully bring us together, then we could finally live in a kind of Lennon-esque harmony with one another. I submit to you that perhaps stupid trademark stories revolving around "Taco Tuesdays" could well be that thing. In America, for instance, a chain called Taco John's has spent the past few years waving around the trademark the USPTO stupidly gave it on the both generic and descriptive term "Taco Tuesdays", insisting that every other business that uses it stop immediately. How this mark was ever granted, given that it describes a good offered on the day it is offered -- tacos on a tuesday -- is a question that has kept me up many a night. Despite the trouble Taco John's has caused with this, the trademark remains registered and in place.

And now it appears that Australia has its own version of this, featuring another company waving around another trademark for "Taco Tuesdays" that never should have been granted.

A stone’s throw into the city’s wild west sits Footscray’s Reverence Hotel, famed for its live music and cheap Tuesday tacos. After six years of dishing up the spicy fare, the landmark corner hotel is suddenly feeling the heat over a claim that it is infringing a trademark held by Mexican food chain Salsas Fresh Mex, which has outlets dotted across Melbourne including a site at Highpoint shopping centre. A letter from Salsas Holdings marketing manager Rebecca Woods to The Reverence Hotel demanded it stop using the phrase ”Taco Tuesday” on its website and social media accounts.

“We assume that you are unaware that Salsas is the owner of the registered trade mark TACO TUESDAY in respect to the provision of Mexican-style food and restaurant services,” it states. “The Mexican-style food offered by Salsas under that trademark has become extremely well and favourably known among members of the public in Australia, and as a result is associated with Salsas.”

I'm going to keep hammering on this until someone listens, because this trademark is not valid. Period. Paragraph. Full stop. It does not identify a source. The phrase itself is generic and common in both the restaurant industry the world over and even in homes around the world. Tuesday is for tacos and nothing about the phrase has anything to do with any individual person or business.

The folks at Footscray's had this same reaction in the most punk venue way possible.

Publican Matt Bodiam said his first reaction on opening the letter on Wednesday was amusement, but he soon realised the potential seriousness.

“I had a bit of a giggle, then [thought] I better look into it,” he said. “I can’t believe someone can trademark ‘Taco Tuesday’; it would be like trademarking ‘Happy Hour’ or ‘Tight-Arse Tuesday’, although perhaps someone has trademarked those as well.”

Actually, the "happy hour" reference is only half right. In that phrase, we have an example of the generic language tons of businesses use. Taco Tuesdays is the same in that respect, except it's also descriptive. This isn't the protection of the consuming public, the very point of trademark law, but rather the locking up of language for commercial purposes. And it's dumb.

But it also works. Salsas has enough of a legal warchest to make Footscray's fighting the good fight on this an absurd notion. It is far easier and less expensive to simply cow to the demands of the trademark bully than putting up a fight in court. Trademark bullying, in other words, works. But perhaps not without giving creative punk venue owners the last laugh.

Mr Bodiam said The Reverence would continue selling tacos on Tuesdays, but the night is now listed on its site as “Taco Sueday”.

Bravo, sir.



Permalink | Comments | Email This Story
]]>
Techdirt
<![CDATA[Athos Ribeiro: Triggering Debian Builds on OBS]]> https://athoscr.me/blog/gsoc2018-5/ https://athoscr.me/blog/gsoc2018-5/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 02:26:18 +0000 This is my fifth post of my Google Summer of Code 2018 series. Links for the previous posts can be found below:

My GSoC contributions can be seen at the following links

Debian builds on OBS

OBS supports building Debian packages. To do so, one must properly configure a project so OBS knows it is building a .deb package and to have the packages needed to handle and build debian packages installed.

openSUSE’s OBS instance has repositories for Debian 8, Debian 9, and Debian testing.

We will use base Debian projects in our OBS instance as Download on Demand projects and use subprojects to achieve our final goal (build packages agains Clang). By using the same configurations as the ones in the openSUSE public projects, we could perform builds in Debian 8 and Debian 9 in our local OBS deploys. However, builds for Debian Testing and Unstable were failing.

With further investigation, we realized the OBS version packaged in Debian cannot decompress control.tar.xz files in .deb packages, which is the default compression format for the control tarball since dpkg-1.19 (it used to be control.tar.gz before that). This issue was reported on the OBS repositories and was fixed on a Pull Request that is not included in the current Debian OBS version yet. For now, we apply this patch in our OBS instance on our salt states.

After applying the patch, the builds on Debian 8 and 9 are still finishing with success, but builds against Debian Testing and Unstable are getting stuck in a blocked state: dependencies are being downloaded, the OBS scheduler stalls for a while, the downloaded packages get cleaned up, and then the dependencies are downloaded again. OBS backend enters in a loop doing the described procedure and never assigns a build to a worker. No logs with hints leading to a possible issue are issued, giving us no clue of the current problem.

Although I am inclined to believe we have a problem with our dependencies list, I am still debugging this issue during this week and will bring more news on my next post.

Refactoring project configuration files

Reshabh opened a Pull Request in our salt repository with the OBS configuration files for Ubuntu, also based on the openSUSE’s OBS public configurations. Based on Sylvestre comments, I have been refactoring the Debian configuration files based on the OBS docuemtation. One of the proposed improvements is to use debootstrap to mount the builder chroot. This will allow us to reduce the number of dependencies listed in the projects configuration files. The issue which generated debootstrap support in OBS is available at https://github.com/openSUSE/obs-build/issues/111 and may lead to more interesting resources on the matter.

Next steps (A TODO list to keep on the radar)

  • Fix OBS builds on Debian Testing and Unstable
  • Write patches for the OBS worker issue described in post 3
  • Change the default builder to perform builds with clang
  • Trigger new builds by using the dak/mailing lists messages
  • Verify the rake-tasks.sh script idempotency and propose patch to opencollab repository
  • Separate salt recipes for workers and server (locally)
  • Properly set hostnames (locally)
]]>
This is my fifth post of my Google Summer of Code 2018 series. Links for the previous posts can be found below:

My GSoC contributions can be seen at the following links

Debian builds on OBS

OBS supports building Debian packages. To do so, one must properly configure a project so OBS knows it is building a .deb package and to have the packages needed to handle and build debian packages installed.

openSUSE’s OBS instance has repositories for Debian 8, Debian 9, and Debian testing.

We will use base Debian projects in our OBS instance as Download on Demand projects and use subprojects to achieve our final goal (build packages agains Clang). By using the same configurations as the ones in the openSUSE public projects, we could perform builds in Debian 8 and Debian 9 in our local OBS deploys. However, builds for Debian Testing and Unstable were failing.

With further investigation, we realized the OBS version packaged in Debian cannot decompress control.tar.xz files in .deb packages, which is the default compression format for the control tarball since dpkg-1.19 (it used to be control.tar.gz before that). This issue was reported on the OBS repositories and was fixed on a Pull Request that is not included in the current Debian OBS version yet. For now, we apply this patch in our OBS instance on our salt states.

After applying the patch, the builds on Debian 8 and 9 are still finishing with success, but builds against Debian Testing and Unstable are getting stuck in a blocked state: dependencies are being downloaded, the OBS scheduler stalls for a while, the downloaded packages get cleaned up, and then the dependencies are downloaded again. OBS backend enters in a loop doing the described procedure and never assigns a build to a worker. No logs with hints leading to a possible issue are issued, giving us no clue of the current problem.

Although I am inclined to believe we have a problem with our dependencies list, I am still debugging this issue during this week and will bring more news on my next post.

Refactoring project configuration files

Reshabh opened a Pull Request in our salt repository with the OBS configuration files for Ubuntu, also based on the openSUSE’s OBS public configurations. Based on Sylvestre comments, I have been refactoring the Debian configuration files based on the OBS docuemtation. One of the proposed improvements is to use debootstrap to mount the builder chroot. This will allow us to reduce the number of dependencies listed in the projects configuration files. The issue which generated debootstrap support in OBS is available at https://github.com/openSUSE/obs-build/issues/111 and may lead to more interesting resources on the matter.

Next steps (A TODO list to keep on the radar)

  • Fix OBS builds on Debian Testing and Unstable
  • Write patches for the OBS worker issue described in post 3
  • Change the default builder to perform builds with clang
  • Trigger new builds by using the dak/mailing lists messages
  • Verify the rake-tasks.sh script idempotency and propose patch to opencollab repository
  • Separate salt recipes for workers and server (locally)
  • Properly set hostnames (locally)
]]>
Debian Planet
<![CDATA[Browse Wikipedia Offline With WebArchives For Linux]]> https://www.linuxuprising.com/2018/06/browse-wikipedia-offline-with.html https://www.linuxuprising.com/2018/06/browse-wikipedia-offline-with.html Wed, 20 Jun 2018 01:20:26 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[Air Force ready to work on Trump’s Space Force idea, but…]]> https://arstechnica.com/?p=1334103 https://arstechnica.com/?p=1334103 Wed, 20 Jun 2018 01:02:47 +0000

Enlarge / Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson and Gen. David L. Goldfein, right, Chief of Staff, prepare for a Senate Armed Services Committee in 2017. (credit: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

On Monday, President Trump went off script and announced that he would remove responsibilities for the space domain from the US Air Force and create a sixth branch of the armed forces he calls the Space Force. "We are going to have the Air Force, and we are going to have the Space Force, separate but equal," Trump said Monday, at the outset of a meeting of the National Space Council. "It is going to be something. So important."

The idea isn't new. For several years, some members of the US Congress have talked about creating a new discipline in the Air Force dubbed the "Space Corps" to focus exclusively on developing "warfighter" capabilities in space. The Air Force and some allies in Congress have pushed back against this idea, and Secretary of Defense James Mattis prefers to keep management of space activities as they are within the Air Force.

Air Force letter

On Tuesday, in a letter to US Air Force personnel obtained by Ars, the Air Force's leadership responded to Trump's proposal. The letter—signed by Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, Chief of Staff David L. Goldfein, and Chief Master Sergeant Kaleth O. Wright—noted that the president's announcement emphasizes the Air Force's important role in meeting potential adversaries in space and recognizes the significance of space as a warfighting domain.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

]]>

Enlarge / Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson and Gen. David L. Goldfein, right, Chief of Staff, prepare for a Senate Armed Services Committee in 2017. (credit: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

On Monday, President Trump went off script and announced that he would remove responsibilities for the space domain from the US Air Force and create a sixth branch of the armed forces he calls the Space Force. "We are going to have the Air Force, and we are going to have the Space Force, separate but equal," Trump said Monday, at the outset of a meeting of the National Space Council. "It is going to be something. So important."

The idea isn't new. For several years, some members of the US Congress have talked about creating a new discipline in the Air Force dubbed the "Space Corps" to focus exclusively on developing "warfighter" capabilities in space. The Air Force and some allies in Congress have pushed back against this idea, and Secretary of Defense James Mattis prefers to keep management of space activities as they are within the Air Force.

Air Force letter

On Tuesday, in a letter to US Air Force personnel obtained by Ars, the Air Force's leadership responded to Trump's proposal. The letter—signed by Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, Chief of Staff David L. Goldfein, and Chief Master Sergeant Kaleth O. Wright—noted that the president's announcement emphasizes the Air Force's important role in meeting potential adversaries in space and recognizes the significance of space as a warfighting domain.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

]]>
Ars Technica News Feed
<![CDATA[How to Install Gitlab on an Ubuntu Server]]> https://www.maketecheasier.com/install-gitlab-ubuntu-server/ https://www.maketecheasier.com/install-gitlab-ubuntu-server/ Tue, 19 Jun 2018 23:50:21 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[President Trump Directs Pentagon To Create A ‘Space Force’ In What Is Surely Not Any Kind Of Distraction From Crying Children]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/techdirt/feed/~3/st48gYKcsXs/president-trump-directs-pentagon-to-create-space-force-what-is-surely-not-any-kind-distraction-crying-children.shtml http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/techdirt/feed/~3/st48gYKcsXs/president-trump-directs-pentagon-to-create-space-force-what-is-surely-not-any-kind-distraction-crying-children.shtml Tue, 19 Jun 2018 22:37:06 +0000 You may recall that about this time last year, the House of Representatives put together a budget that included funding for a brand new military branch dubbed the Space Force. At the time, our take is that this was always inevitable, as humanity tends to carry its war-making luggage everywhere we go and, since we go to space, we're going to have a Space Force. More surprising was the pushback from those who have a thing or two to say about military matters, such as Secretary of Defense James Mattis, who noted that setting up a new military branch was hellishly complicated, and required congressional approval.

Mattis, in a letter to Rep. Mike Turner -- an Ohio Republican leading the congressional effort against the Space Corps -- said he was opposed to adding "additional organizational and administrative tail" to the Pentagon.

"At a time when we are trying to integrate the Department's joint warfighting functions, I do not wish to add a separate service that would likely present a narrower and even parochial approach to space operations," Mattis wrote.

One can read that as government-speak for: "No, this is stupid, why are you proposing this, everything is going fine, hey, is this thing even on?" Currently, space-based operations for the military are headed up by the Air Force Space Command. There is no denying that orbital operations are critical to the success of the United States military, given all of the satellite assets currently floating around the near-inky void. There has also been no indication that the Air Force is not up to the job, given the current lack of space-based infantry skirmishes or ground (ahem) operations.

This week, however, President Trump directed the Pentagon to create his new Space Force. It would be absolutely absurd not to notice the timing of the announcement that grabbed at least some of the headline space from news organizations that would otherwise have been directed at video and audio of toddlers in cages as they wept openly for their parents. It seems the Dear Leader couldn't help but notice this timing either, even as he made his announcement.

In remarks that ranged over a variety of unrelated topics, Mr. Trump began by saying current U.S. employment levels were the best "in recorded history" and blaming current immigration problems on the Democrats, saying "we have the worst immigration laws in the entire world" and that ongoing issues could be resolved "very quickly if the Democrats come to the table."

Turning his attention to space, the president praised the National Space Council and its chairman, Vice President Mike Pence, for its work re-focusing national space policy, saying "for too many years, our dreams of exploration and discovery were really squandered by politics and bureaucracy. And we knocked that out."

"My administration is reclaiming America's heritage as the world's greatest space-faring nation," he went on. "The essence of the American character is to explore new horizons and to tame new frontiers. But our destiny, beyond the Earth, is not only a matter of national identity, but a matter of national security."

Look, space exploration is sorely in need of funding. That said, nothing about creating a new fighting force for space is going to be quick, easy, or bring about the kinds of results we could see either by funding current space exploration organizations (hey, remember NASA?) or private companies now taking up the challenge. As the Pentagon noted in its response, this foray into the final frontier is going to take a long, long time to set up.

The Pentagon's chief spokesperson Dana W. White issued a statement suggesting the process will take some time.

"We understand the President's guidance. Our Policy Board will begin working on this issue, which has implications for intelligence operations for the Air Force, Army, Marines and Navy. Working with Congress, this will be a deliberate process with a great deal of input from multiple stakeholders."

One can read that as Pentagon-speak for: "Uh, okay, but this is going to take, like, forever." Which, honestly, is probably besides the point. Whatever you might think of the current politics and immigration policy on display, there is little denying that this grand announcement came on the heels of a deluge of negative press and headlines for the President. Whatever side of the political spectrum you're on, hopefully we're all in agreement that space operations are important. If we do, then we should likewise agree that callous calls for massive new programs and full military branches being used as a distraction are an affront to that importance.



Permalink | Comments | Email This Story
]]>
You may recall that about this time last year, the House of Representatives put together a budget that included funding for a brand new military branch dubbed the Space Force. At the time, our take is that this was always inevitable, as humanity tends to carry its war-making luggage everywhere we go and, since we go to space, we're going to have a Space Force. More surprising was the pushback from those who have a thing or two to say about military matters, such as Secretary of Defense James Mattis, who noted that setting up a new military branch was hellishly complicated, and required congressional approval.

Mattis, in a letter to Rep. Mike Turner -- an Ohio Republican leading the congressional effort against the Space Corps -- said he was opposed to adding "additional organizational and administrative tail" to the Pentagon.

"At a time when we are trying to integrate the Department's joint warfighting functions, I do not wish to add a separate service that would likely present a narrower and even parochial approach to space operations," Mattis wrote.

One can read that as government-speak for: "No, this is stupid, why are you proposing this, everything is going fine, hey, is this thing even on?" Currently, space-based operations for the military are headed up by the Air Force Space Command. There is no denying that orbital operations are critical to the success of the United States military, given all of the satellite assets currently floating around the near-inky void. There has also been no indication that the Air Force is not up to the job, given the current lack of space-based infantry skirmishes or ground (ahem) operations.

This week, however, President Trump directed the Pentagon to create his new Space Force. It would be absolutely absurd not to notice the timing of the announcement that grabbed at least some of the headline space from news organizations that would otherwise have been directed at video and audio of toddlers in cages as they wept openly for their parents. It seems the Dear Leader couldn't help but notice this timing either, even as he made his announcement.

In remarks that ranged over a variety of unrelated topics, Mr. Trump began by saying current U.S. employment levels were the best "in recorded history" and blaming current immigration problems on the Democrats, saying "we have the worst immigration laws in the entire world" and that ongoing issues could be resolved "very quickly if the Democrats come to the table."

Turning his attention to space, the president praised the National Space Council and its chairman, Vice President Mike Pence, for its work re-focusing national space policy, saying "for too many years, our dreams of exploration and discovery were really squandered by politics and bureaucracy. And we knocked that out."

"My administration is reclaiming America's heritage as the world's greatest space-faring nation," he went on. "The essence of the American character is to explore new horizons and to tame new frontiers. But our destiny, beyond the Earth, is not only a matter of national identity, but a matter of national security."

Look, space exploration is sorely in need of funding. That said, nothing about creating a new fighting force for space is going to be quick, easy, or bring about the kinds of results we could see either by funding current space exploration organizations (hey, remember NASA?) or private companies now taking up the challenge. As the Pentagon noted in its response, this foray into the final frontier is going to take a long, long time to set up.

The Pentagon's chief spokesperson Dana W. White issued a statement suggesting the process will take some time.

"We understand the President's guidance. Our Policy Board will begin working on this issue, which has implications for intelligence operations for the Air Force, Army, Marines and Navy. Working with Congress, this will be a deliberate process with a great deal of input from multiple stakeholders."

One can read that as Pentagon-speak for: "Uh, okay, but this is going to take, like, forever." Which, honestly, is probably besides the point. Whatever you might think of the current politics and immigration policy on display, there is little denying that this grand announcement came on the heels of a deluge of negative press and headlines for the President. Whatever side of the political spectrum you're on, hopefully we're all in agreement that space operations are important. If we do, then we should likewise agree that callous calls for massive new programs and full military branches being used as a distraction are an affront to that importance.



Permalink | Comments | Email This Story
]]>
Techdirt
<![CDATA[Linux unexpand Command Explained for Beginners (with Examples)]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/GTP4ewTBdes/linux-unexpand-command-explained-for-beginners-with-examples-180619015516.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/GTP4ewTBdes/linux-unexpand-command-explained-for-beginners-with-examples-180619015516.html Tue, 19 Jun 2018 22:00:00 +0000  HowToForge: Working on the Linux command line requires to learn how to quickly perform some repetitive tasks.

]]>
 HowToForge: Working on the Linux command line requires to learn how to quickly perform some repetitive tasks.

]]>
Linux Today
<![CDATA[Android Messages for Desktop Now Rolling Out as a Web-Based Service]]> https://news.softpedia.com/news/android-messages-for-desktop-now-rolling-out-as-a-web-based-service-521610.shtml https://news.softpedia.com/news/android-messages-for-desktop-now-rolling-out-as-a-web-based-service-521610.shtml Tue, 19 Jun 2018 21:20:27 +0000 LXer <![CDATA[Cooking with Linux (without a Net): Video editing on Linux using Kdenlive and ArcoLinux, too!]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxjournalcom/~3/AQSaMBCDd6U/cooking-linux-without-net-video-editing-linux-using-kdenlive-and-arcolinux-too http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxjournalcom/~3/AQSaMBCDd6U/cooking-linux-without-net-video-editing-linux-using-kdenlive-and-arcolinux-too Tue, 19 Jun 2018 21:16:53 +0000

Please support Linux Journal by subscribing or becoming a patron.

It's another Tuesday and another excuse to sip some red while doing some live Linux and open-source experimentation. Yes, it's time for Cooking with Linux (without a Net), and on today's show, I'll show you how to edit a video using the Kdenlive video editor, how to trim said video, adjust audio, fade between clips and apply all sorts of fun effects. Then, I'll show you how to turn that masterpiece into a video format suitable for uploading to YouTube! All of it live, on camera, and without the benefit of post video editing—therefore providing a high probability of falling flat on my face. Once we're done doing art, I'll try out ArcoLinux, another distribution you've probably never heard of, and I'll go through the installation for you. If it wasn't already obvious, this is a pre-recorded video of a live show.

]]>

Please support Linux Journal by subscribing or becoming a patron.

It's another Tuesday and another excuse to sip some red while doing some live Linux and open-source experimentation. Yes, it's time for Cooking with Linux (without a Net), and on today's show, I'll show you how to edit a video using the Kdenlive video editor, how to trim said video, adjust audio, fade between clips and apply all sorts of fun effects. Then, I'll show you how to turn that masterpiece into a video format suitable for uploading to YouTube! All of it live, on camera, and without the benefit of post video editing—therefore providing a high probability of falling flat on my face. Once we're done doing art, I'll try out ArcoLinux, another distribution you've probably never heard of, and I'll go through the installation for you. If it wasn't already obvious, this is a pre-recorded video of a live show.

]]>
Linux Journal
<![CDATA[umonitor – Update Resolutions of Monitors on Hotplugged in Linux]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/LbS_JJgjFTk/umonitor-update-resolutions-of-monitors-on-hotplugged-in-linux-180619000536.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/LbS_JJgjFTk/umonitor-update-resolutions-of-monitors-on-hotplugged-in-linux-180619000536.html Tue, 19 Jun 2018 21:00:00 +0000 linoxide: umonitor is a dynamic monitor management written in C and distributed as a single binary package

]]>
linoxide: umonitor is a dynamic monitor management written in C and distributed as a single binary package

]]>
Linux Today
<![CDATA[Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster” Installer Updated with Linux Kernel 4.16 Support]]> https://news.softpedia.com/news/debian-gnu-linux-10-buster-installer-updated-with-linux-kernel-4-16-support-521631.shtml https://news.softpedia.com/news/debian-gnu-linux-10-buster-installer-updated-with-linux-kernel-4-16-support-521631.shtml Tue, 19 Jun 2018 20:59:00 +0000 The Debian Project announced the release of the third alpha build of the installer for the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series, due for release in mid-2019.

Developed under the Debian Testing umbrella, the forthcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series just received today the third alpha milestone of its installer, which lets people install the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers, servers, and IoT devices, such as the Raspberry Pi.

One of the most interesting changes that caught out eyes is the bump of the kernel support from Linux kernel 4.13, which was used in the second alpha build, to Linux kernel 4.16. Of course, this means that there's better hardware support, so chances are you'll be able to install the development version of Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" on newer machines or if you have some exotic components on ... (read more)]]>
The Debian Project announced the release of the third alpha build of the installer for the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series, due for release in mid-2019.

Developed under the Debian Testing umbrella, the forthcoming Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series just received today the third alpha milestone of its installer, which lets people install the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers, servers, and IoT devices, such as the Raspberry Pi.

One of the most interesting changes that caught out eyes is the bump of the kernel support from Linux kernel 4.13, which was used in the second alpha build, to Linux kernel 4.16. Of course, this means that there's better hardware support, so chances are you'll be able to install the development version of Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" on newer machines or if you have some exotic components on ... (read more)]]>
Softpedia
<![CDATA[Jurassic World Evolution review: Genetic dead ends]]> https://arstechnica.com/?p=1333981 https://arstechnica.com/?p=1333981 Tue, 19 Jun 2018 20:40:00 +0000

Enlarge / She does, in fact, eat the goat. (credit: Frontier Developments)


Jurassic World might just be the worst movie I ever paid money to see. It wasted a perfectly fine premise (rich people doubling down on past mistakes for profit) on a soulless, oddly sadistic “adventure” that wiped out whatever hope I had left that there will ever be a great sequel to the wonderful 1993 original Jurassic Park.

Which is why I’m thrilled that, despite sharing a name, Jurassic World Evolution has nearly nothing to do with that infuriatingly profitable nightmare. There are nods here and there: you can eventually build those hideous bubble cars, for instance. Bryce Dallas Howard seemingly contributed about 30 seconds of voice acting. There’s a Chris Pratt soundalike to match a photo of his face that occasionally advises you. Other than that, though, this park management sim is its own scaly beast.

As well it should be. When it comes to good premises, planning and operating your own version of Jurassic Park is definitely one. And I’m happy to say Evolution uses that potential much better than its namesake film—at least for a while.

Managing managers

The plot of Evolution basically ignores the events of both World films. You’re just a faceless, nameless manager selected to make a new dinosaur park profitable. That means cloning terrible lizards, arranging gift shops and restaurants for audiences, and keeping your corporate departments happy. That last item is especially important. Managing park attendance earns cash, but playing nice with your heads of science, entertainment, and security is how you progress through the game.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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Enlarge / She does, in fact, eat the goat. (credit: Frontier Developments)


Jurassic World might just be the worst movie I ever paid money to see. It wasted a perfectly fine premise (rich people doubling down on past mistakes for profit) on a soulless, oddly sadistic “adventure” that wiped out whatever hope I had left that there will ever be a great sequel to the wonderful 1993 original Jurassic Park.

Which is why I’m thrilled that, despite sharing a name, Jurassic World Evolution has nearly nothing to do with that infuriatingly profitable nightmare. There are nods here and there: you can eventually build those hideous bubble cars, for instance. Bryce Dallas Howard seemingly contributed about 30 seconds of voice acting. There’s a Chris Pratt soundalike to match a photo of his face that occasionally advises you. Other than that, though, this park management sim is its own scaly beast.

As well it should be. When it comes to good premises, planning and operating your own version of Jurassic Park is definitely one. And I’m happy to say Evolution uses that potential much better than its namesake film—at least for a while.

Managing managers

The plot of Evolution basically ignores the events of both World films. You’re just a faceless, nameless manager selected to make a new dinosaur park profitable. That means cloning terrible lizards, arranging gift shops and restaurants for audiences, and keeping your corporate departments happy. That last item is especially important. Managing park attendance earns cash, but playing nice with your heads of science, entertainment, and security is how you progress through the game.

Read 14 remaining paragraphs | Comments

]]>
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<![CDATA[Techdirt Podcast Episode 171: Debating Steam’s New Hands-Off Policy]]> http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/techdirt/feed/~3/mcMTOh_1wX4/techdirt-podcast-episode-171-debating-steams-new-hands-off-policy.shtml http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/techdirt/feed/~3/mcMTOh_1wX4/techdirt-podcast-episode-171-debating-steams-new-hands-off-policy.shtml Tue, 19 Jun 2018 20:30:00 +0000

Recently, Valve sent waves through the PC gaming world by announcing an upcoming policy change for its Steam platform: it will no longer enforce specific content rules and will allow all games as long as they aren't illegal or "straight-up trolling". Though it's not exactly clear what this means, the reaction from the gaming press has been largely negative, and it's hard to say how the new policy will be implemented — so this week myself, Tim Geigner and Cathy Gellis join the podcast to discuss just what's going to happen on the biggest platform for PC games.

Follow the Techdirt Podcast on Soundcloud, subscribe via iTunes or Google Play, or grab the RSS feed. You can also keep up with all the latest episodes right here on Techdirt.



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Recently, Valve sent waves through the PC gaming world by announcing an upcoming policy change for its Steam platform: it will no longer enforce specific content rules and will allow all games as long as they aren't illegal or "straight-up trolling". Though it's not exactly clear what this means, the reaction from the gaming press has been largely negative, and it's hard to say how the new policy will be implemented — so this week myself, Tim Geigner and Cathy Gellis join the podcast to discuss just what's going to happen on the biggest platform for PC games.

Follow the Techdirt Podcast on Soundcloud, subscribe via iTunes or Google Play, or grab the RSS feed. You can also keep up with all the latest episodes right here on Techdirt.



Permalink | Comments | Email This Story
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Techdirt
<![CDATA[Fabian Affolter: Fedora IoT and Home Assistant]]> http://fabian-affolter.ch/blog/fedora-iot-and-home-assistant/ http://fabian-affolter.ch/blog/fedora-iot-and-home-assistant/ Tue, 19 Jun 2018 20:28:10 +0000

As announced is Fedora IoT still pretty close to Fedora Atomic but I was curious how it “looks and feels”. Ok, more “feels” than there is not much see beside the prompt. My encounters with different ARM hardware and Fedora in the past where not always successful, thus I decided to take a Raspberry Pi Model B instead of one out of the Orange Pi family.

First step is to get a nightly image build Fedora IoT as described in the Getting started documentation.

# wget https://ftp-stud.hs-esslingen.de/pub/Mirrors/alt.fedoraproject.org/iot/20180618.0/IoT/aarch64/images/Fedora-IoT-28-20180618.0.aarch64.raw.xz

Just a side note: With the ARM installer, which is available in Rawhide, the

Error: mount /dev/mmcblk0p4 /tmp/root failed
  error is gone. It might be that the same applies to Fedora 28 as well but was present in Fedora 27.

Let the ARM installer create the SD card.

# arm-image-installer --image=Fedora-IoT-28-20180618.0.aarch64.raw.xz --target=rpi3 --media=/dev/mmcblk0 --resizefs

=====================================================
= Selected Image:
= Fedora-IoT-28-20180618.0.aarch64.raw.xz
= Selected Media : /dev/mmcblk0
= U-Boot Target : rpi3
= Root partition will be resized
=====================================================

*****************************************************
*****************************************************
******** WARNING! ALL DATA WILL BE DESTROYED ********
*****************************************************
*****************************************************

Type 'YES' to proceed, anything else to exit now

= Proceed? YES
= Writing:
= Fedora-IoT-28-20180618.0.aarch64.raw.xz
= To: /dev/mmcblk0 ....
0+403205 records in
0+403205 records out
4294967296 bytes (4.3 GB, 4.0 GiB) copied, 352.665 s, 12.2 MB/s
= Writing image complete!
= Resizing /dev/mmcblk0 ....
e2fsck 1.44.2 (14-May-2018)
Pass 1: Checking inodes, blocks, and sizes
Pass 2: Checking directory structure
Pass 3: Checking directory connectivity
Pass 4: Checking reference counts
Pass 5: Checking group summary information
/dev/mmcblk0p3: 35398/187680 files (0.7% non-contiguous), 307012/749568 blocks
resize2fs 1.44.2 (14-May-2018)
The filesystem is already 749568 (4k) blocks long. Nothing to do!

= Raspberry Pi 3 Uboot is already in place, no changes needed.

= Installation Complete! Insert into the rpi3 and boot.

After booting the Raspberry Pi up, create a new user. Now you are able to use SSH to log in. The current build of Fedora IoT allows you to use a recent kernel.

# uname -r
4.16.15-300.fc28.aarch64

Of course is the deployment up-to-date. One advantage of nightly build if you are using one the next morning 😉 .

# rpm-ostree status
State: idle; auto updates disabled
Deployments:
● ostree://fedora-iot:fedora/28/aarch64/iot
Version: 28.20180617.0 (2018-06-17 10:36:57)
Commit: a3aee4deaa6887bfc3088ad891dfa22b4a729e802905c5135c676e440124784a
GPGSignature: Valid signature by 128CF232A9371991C8A65695E08E7E629DB62FB1

Instead of Docker is

podman
  used to deal with all container-related tasks. To get the Home Assistant images run the command below:

# podman pull homeassistant/aarch64-homeassistant

As you can see it’s pretty much the same as using the 

docker
 command-line tool.

Create a directory to store the configuration.

# mk dir -p /opt/home-assistant

And start the Home Assistant after you have adjusted the host’s firewall to match your needs.

# podman run -it --rm --name="home-assistant" 
    --network=bridge --publish=8123:8123 
    -v /opt/home-assistant:/config:Z 
    -v /et c/localtime:/et c/localtime:ro 
    homeassistant/aarch64-homeassistant

Et voilà, http://IP_ADDRESS_FEDORA_IOT_HOST:8123 is serving the Home Assistant frontend.

I will skip the autostart part as this is already covered in the blog post about Project Atomic and Home Assistant. No much news in this blog post beside

podman
. Pulling images are problematic at first because often the download stopped somewhere over 95 % (no, never at 20 % or 60 % ) in my case a local registry solved the issue for now.

]]>

As announced is Fedora IoT still pretty close to Fedora Atomic but I was curious how it “looks and feels”. Ok, more “feels” than there is not much see beside the prompt. My encounters with different ARM hardware and Fedora in the past where not always successful, thus I decided to take a Raspberry Pi Model B instead of one out of the Orange Pi family.

First step is to get a nightly image build Fedora IoT as described in the Getting started documentation.

# wget https://ftp-stud.hs-esslingen.de/pub/Mirrors/alt.fedoraproject.org/iot/20180618.0/IoT/aarch64/images/Fedora-IoT-28-20180618.0.aarch64.raw.xz

Just a side note: With the ARM installer, which is available in Rawhide, the

Error: mount /dev/mmcblk0p4 /tmp/root failed
  error is gone. It might be that the same applies to Fedora 28 as well but was present in Fedora 27.

Let the ARM installer create the SD card.

# arm-image-installer --image=Fedora-IoT-28-20180618.0.aarch64.raw.xz --target=rpi3 --media=/dev/mmcblk0 --resizefs

=====================================================
= Selected Image:
= Fedora-IoT-28-20180618.0.aarch64.raw.xz
= Selected Media : /dev/mmcblk0
= U-Boot Target : rpi3
= Root partition will be resized
=====================================================

*****************************************************
*****************************************************
******** WARNING! ALL DATA WILL BE DESTROYED ********
*****************************************************
*****************************************************

Type 'YES' to proceed, anything else to exit now

= Proceed? YES
= Writing:
= Fedora-IoT-28-20180618.0.aarch64.raw.xz
= To: /dev/mmcblk0 ....
0+403205 records in
0+403205 records out
4294967296 bytes (4.3 GB, 4.0 GiB) copied, 352.665 s, 12.2 MB/s
= Writing image complete!
= Resizing /dev/mmcblk0 ....
e2fsck 1.44.2 (14-May-2018)
Pass 1: Checking inodes, blocks, and sizes
Pass 2: Checking directory structure
Pass 3: Checking directory connectivity
Pass 4: Checking reference counts
Pass 5: Checking group summary information
/dev/mmcblk0p3: 35398/187680 files (0.7% non-contiguous), 307012/749568 blocks
resize2fs 1.44.2 (14-May-2018)
The filesystem is already 749568 (4k) blocks long. Nothing to do!

= Raspberry Pi 3 Uboot is already in place, no changes needed.

= Installation Complete! Insert into the rpi3 and boot.

After booting the Raspberry Pi up, create a new user. Now you are able to use SSH to log in. The current build of Fedora IoT allows you to use a recent kernel.

# uname -r
4.16.15-300.fc28.aarch64

Of course is the deployment up-to-date. One advantage of nightly build if you are using one the next morning 😉 .

# rpm-ostree status
State: idle; auto updates disabled
Deployments:
● ostree://fedora-iot:fedora/28/aarch64/iot
Version: 28.20180617.0 (2018-06-17 10:36:57)
Commit: a3aee4deaa6887bfc3088ad891dfa22b4a729e802905c5135c676e440124784a
GPGSignature: Valid signature by 128CF232A9371991C8A65695E08E7E629DB62FB1

Instead of Docker is

podman
  used to deal with all container-related tasks. To get the Home Assistant images run the command below:

# podman pull homeassistant/aarch64-homeassistant

As you can see it’s pretty much the same as using the 

docker
 command-line tool.

Create a directory to store the configuration.

# mk dir -p /opt/home-assistant

And start the Home Assistant after you have adjusted the host’s firewall to match your needs.

# podman run -it --rm --name="home-assistant" 
    --network=bridge --publish=8123:8123 
    -v /opt/home-assistant:/config:Z 
    -v /et c/localtime:/et c/localtime:ro 
    homeassistant/aarch64-homeassistant

Et voilà, http://IP_ADDRESS_FEDORA_IOT_HOST:8123 is serving the Home Assistant frontend.

I will skip the autostart part as this is already covered in the blog post about Project Atomic and Home Assistant. No much news in this blog post beside

podman
. Pulling images are problematic at first because often the download stopped somewhere over 95 % (no, never at 20 % or 60 % ) in my case a local registry solved the issue for now.

]]>
Fedora Planet