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February 1st, 2015

January’s Top Ten

These are the ten most read articles on FOSS Force for the month of January, 2015.

1. Saying Goodbye to Java the Hard Way by Ken Starks. Published January 20, 2015. A look across the chasm between FOSS idealism and FOSS pragmatism.

2. Top Ten Things Linux Users Say About systemd by FOSS Force staff. Published January 24, 2015. A humorous look at those who argue for and against systemd.

3. ‘Linux Advocates’ Throws in the Towel by FOSS Force staff. Published January 10, 2015. A Linux and FOSS orientated website bites the dust.

4. Linux Distros We’ll Never See by Larry Cafiero. Published January 14, 2015. Cafiero takes us into a FOSS Twilight Zone where Linux distros have names like Bill and Ted’s Excellent Linux.

5. Microsoft Can’t Sell Laptops or Phones by Christine Hall. Published January 19, 2015. This holiday season, none of Amazon’s top three bestselling laptops were installed with Windows and Microsoft’s phone share hovers at about 3 percent.

6. Despite Rumors, Xfce Alive & Kicking by Larry Cafiero. Published December 31, 2014. Putting to rest rumors that the popular Linux desktop environment Xfce is no longer under development.

7. Firefox OS: It’s Not You, It’s Me by Larry Cafiero. Published January 7, 2015. Saying goodbye to Firefox OS and returning to Android.

8. Jeff Hoogland On the Future of & Life After Bodhi by Christine Hall. Published January 12, 2015. An interview with Jeff Hoogland published just days before his decision to return to Bodhi Linux.

9. Desktop Search: KDE’s Crazy Uncle by Ken Starks. Published January 27, 2015. An article in which Starks observes that software development is “the job of a developer, not the end user.”

10. When ‘Release Early, Release Often’ Is a Problem by Christine Hall. Published January 5, 2015. For some software projects, a slow and methodical approach to releasing new versions may be preferable to a quick release schedule.

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