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April 22nd, 2016

JavaZone Sells Open Source in TV Parodies

The Video Screening Room

This movie trailer spoof sells a movie that’s definitely not coming soon to a theater near you. If it were, however, you can bet your booty it’d be released under a Creative Commons license.

When I found out that I was going to have the opportunity to substitute for Phil Shapiro for today’s video column, I jumped at the chance. Why? Because I want to share with you one of the great TV parodies that the JavaZone conference produces each year.

JavaZone logoIn case you don’t know, since its beginning fifteen years ago, JavaZone has grown to be the largest independent conference for Java developers on the planet. The conference is held each year in Oslo, Norway, with this year’s event scheduled for September 7-8.

You don’t have to be a big Java fan to really like these folks, for they are 100 percent — that means totally for those of you who have trouble with numbers — behind open source. For the past six years or so, they’ve produced annual video parodies of popular television shows, which over time have become increasingly lavish productions.

My absolute favorite of these is 2014’s Game of Codes, based on…well, I’ll let you figure that out. For today’s presentation, however, I’m reaching back to 2010 when the conference presented a send-up movie trailer of a make-believe movie called “Jave 4-ever.”

I’ve chosen this one partly because it’s in Norwegian and reminds me a lot of Lilyhammer, the fish out of water show that got me hooked on Netflix. Mainly, however, I’ve chosen it because its three minute and 16 seconds is almost entirely spent poking fun of users of a certain proprietary company’s products.

Oh yeah, I also chose it because it has music by the Turtles, which probably explains the popup advertisement that needs clicking away. The RIAA wants paid, you know, even if it is fair use.

Phil Shapiro will be back on Tuesday. Have a great weekend.

Christine Hall has been a journalist since 1971. In 2001, she began writing a weekly consumer computer column and started covering Linux and FOSS in 2002 after making the switch to GNU/Linux. Follow her on Twitter: @BrideOfLinux

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