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September 1st, 2014

August’s Top Ten

These are the ten most read articles on FOSS Force for the month of August, 2014.

1. When Linux Was Perfect Enough by Christine Hall. Published August 3, 2014. Linux might be better than ever, but that doesn’t keep some Linux users from complaining.

2. When the Police Can Brick Your Phone by Christine Hall. Published August 16, 2014. Laws designed to protect mobile devices from theft could be used by the police against protesters.

3. Computer Dating, Linux Style by Ken Starks. Published August 6, 2014. A tale of love and romance in the FOSS world.

4. Don’t Fret Linus, Desktop Linux Will Slowly Gain Traction by Christine Hall. Published August 25, 2014. There might never be a “year of Linux,” but the penguin will eventually be a dominant force on the desktop, as it already is everywhere else.

5. It’s All Linux Under the Hood by Christine Hall. Published August 28, 2014. Don’t let the techno-geeks convince you otherwise — your easy-to-use distro is just as powerful and stable as the distros they prefer.

6. USB Ports Are No Longer Your Friend (If They Ever Were) by Christine Hall. Published August 9, 2014. A design flaw has been discovered in the USB standard that might eventually threaten the use of USB devices.

7. When Distros Go South by Ken Starks. Published August 26, 2014. Some things to consider when choosing a Linux distro

8. Dangling the Linux Carrot by Ken Starks. Published August 20, 2014. Harnessing the power of the negative sell to prod people into making the Linux switch.

9. The Time to Recommend Linux & FOSS Is Now by Christine Hall. Published August 18, 2014. More people than ever know about Linux, and more of them are willing to give it a try.

10. Linux Advocates in the Wild by Ken Starks. Sometimes, when you turn a friend on to Linux, that friend goes on to turn others on to Linux as well.

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